📽 Video: How an Emergency Injection works!

What should you do if an Addison crisis threatens? How do you prepare an emergency injection and how do you administer it?

If you have a gastrointestinal infection, accompanied by diarrhea and vomiting, there is a big risk of an Addison crisis.

Always discuss with your specialist what you have done and what else needs to be done. Explain to your family, colleagues and friends what illness you have, and what they should do if necessary.

Show them the animated clip below.

🎬 VIDEO: ‘Subclinical’ Cushing’s syndrome needs new name

In this video exclusive, Endocrine Today Editorial Board Member Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, professor of neurological surgery and professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and clinical nutrition in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University and director of the OHSU Northwest Pituitary Center, discusses why mild Cushing’s syndrome matters.

In the past mild autonomous Cushing’s has been referred to as “subclinical Cushing’s syndrome.”

“What is subclinical about a patient that has, for example, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis?” Fleseriu said.

She describes how to screen for and treat mild Cushing’s syndrome in patients with adrenal incidentalomas.

Watch the video for more.  If it doesn’t show up, please click here.

From Helio

🎬 Video: How the Body Works: The Adrenal Cortex and Medulla

The adrenal glands sitting above the kidneys are richly supplied with blood and with sympathetic nerve endings. Block sections show the blood supply and cellular arrangement of the adrenals.

Two different regions are distinguishable–the cortex, controlled by the pituitary hormone ACTH, produces hormones which maintain body chemistry, and the medulla, which secretes adrenaline and noradrenaline to increase body activity.