💉 Helpful Doctors: California

Dr. Daniel Kelly, a board certified neurosurgeon, is Director of the Pacific Neuroscience Institute and Professor of Neurosurgery at the John Wayne Cancer Institute.

Considered to be one of the best neurosurgeons in the US and a multiple recipient of the Patients’ Choice Award, Dr. Kelly is internationally recognized in the field of minimally invasive keyhole surgery for brain, pituitary and skull base tumors.

He has one of the world’s largest series in endonasal surgery with over 2000 procedures performed including over 800 endonasal endoscopic surgeries, and over 2000 craniotomies for brain and skull base tumors. His current surgical practice encompasses the full spectrum of brain and skull base tumors, both benign and malignant, treated with minimally invasive and conventional approaches.

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📽 Video: How an Emergency Injection works!

What should you do if an Addison crisis threatens? How do you prepare an emergency injection and how do you administer it?

If you have a gastrointestinal infection, accompanied by diarrhea and vomiting, there is a big risk of an Addison crisis.

Always discuss with your specialist what you have done and what else needs to be done. Explain to your family, colleagues and friends what illness you have, and what they should do if necessary.

Show them the animated clip below.

🦓Day 24, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2020

This is another semi-religious post so feel free to skip it 🙂

I’m sure that many would think that Abide With Me is a pretty strange choice for my all-time favorite hymn.

My dad was a Congregational (now United Church of Christ) minister so I was pretty regular in church attendance in my younger years.

Some Sunday evenings, he would preach on a circuit and I’d go with him to some of these tiny churches.  The people there, mostly older folks, liked the old hymns best – Fanny Crosby and so on.

So, some of my “favorite hymns” are those that I sang when I was out with my Dad.  Fond memories from long ago.

In 1986 I was finally diagnosed with Cushing’s after struggling with doctors and trying to get them to test for about 5 years.  I was going to go into the NIH (National Institutes of Health) in Bethesda, MD for final testing and then-experimental pituitary surgery.

I was terrified and sure that I wouldn’t survive the surgery.

Somehow, I found a 3-cassette tape set of Readers Digest Hymns and Songs of Inspiration and ordered that. The set came just before I went to NIH and I had it with me.

At NIH I set up a daily “routine” of sorts and listening to these tapes was a very important part of my day and helped me get through the ordeal of more testing, surgery, post-op and more.

When I had my kidney cancer surgery, those tapes were long broken and irreplaceable, but I had replaced all the songs – this time on my iPod.

Abide With Me was on this original tape set and it remains a favorite to this day.  Whenever we have an opportunity in church to pick a favorite, my hand always shoots up and I request page 700.  When someone in one of my handbell groups moves away, we always sign a hymnbook and give it to them.  I sign page 700.

I think that many people would probably think that this hymn is depressing.  Maybe it is but to me it signifies times in my life when I thought I might die and I was so comforted by the sentiments here.

This hymn is often associated with funeral services and has given hope and comfort to so many over the years – me included.

If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, you will ask what you desire, and it shall be done for you.

~John 15:7

Abide With Me

Words: Henry F. Lyte, 1847.

Music: Eventide, William H. Monk, 1861. Mrs. Monk described the setting:

This tune was written at a time of great sorrow—when together we watched, as we did daily, the glories of the setting sun. As the last golden ray faded, he took some paper and penciled that tune which has gone all over the earth.

Lyte was inspired to write this hymn as he was dying of tuberculosis; he finished it the Sunday he gave his farewell sermon in the parish he served so many years. The next day, he left for Italy to regain his health. He didn’t make it, though—he died in Nice, France, three weeks after writing these words. Here is an excerpt from his farewell sermon:

O brethren, I stand here among you today, as alive from the dead, if I may hope to impress it upon you, and induce you to prepare for that solemn hour which must come to all, by a timely acquaintance with the death of Christ.

For over a century, the bells of his church at All Saints in Lower Brixham, Devonshire, have rung out “Abide with Me” daily. The hymn was sung at the wedding of King George VI, at the wedding of his daughter, the future Queen Elizabeth II, and at the funeral of Nobel peace prize winner Mother Teresa of Calcutta in1997.

Abide with me; fast falls the eventide;

The darkness deepens; Lord with me abide.

When other helpers fail and comforts flee,

Help of the helpless, O abide with me.

Swift to its close ebbs out life’s little day;

Earth’s joys grow dim; its glories pass away;

Change and decay in all around I see;

O Thou who changest not, abide with me.

Not a brief glance I beg, a passing word;

But as Thou dwell’st with Thy disciples, Lord,

Familiar, condescending, patient, free.

Come not to sojourn, but abide with me.

Come not in terrors, as the King of kings,

But kind and good, with healing in Thy wings,

Tears for all woes, a heart for every plea—

Come, Friend of sinners, and thus bide with me.

Thou on my head in early youth didst smile;

And, though rebellious and perverse meanwhile,

Thou hast not left me, oft as I left Thee,

On to the close, O Lord, abide with me.

I need Thy presence every passing hour.

What but Thy grace can foil the tempter’s power?

Who, like Thyself, my guide and stay can be?

Through cloud and sunshine, Lord, abide with me.

I fear no foe, with Thee at hand to bless;

Ills have no weight, and tears no bitterness.

Where is death’s sting? Where, grave, thy victory?

I triumph still, if Thou abide with me.

Hold Thou Thy cross before my closing eyes;

Shine through the gloom and point me to the skies.

Heaven’s morning breaks, and earth’s vain shadows flee;

In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me.

🦓 Day 10, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2020

 

This is one of the suggestions from the Cushing’s Awareness Challenge post:

What have you learned about the medical community since you have become sick?

This one is so easy. I’ve said it a thousand times – you know your own body better than any doctor will. Most doctors have never seen a Cushing’s patient, few ever will in the future.

If you believe you have Cushing’s (or any other rare disease), learn what you can about it, connect with other patients, make a timeline of symptoms and photographs. Read, take notes, save all your doctors’ notes, keep your lab findings, get second/third/ten or more opinions.  Make a calendar showing which days you had what symptoms.  Google calendars are great for this.

This is your life, your one and only shot (no pun intended!) at it. Make it the best and healthiest that you can.

When my friend and fellow e-patient Dave deBronkart learned he had a rare and terminal kidney cancer, he turned to a group of fellow patients online and found a medical treatment that even his own doctors didn’t know. It saved his life.

In this video, he calls on all patients to talk with one another, know their own health data, and make health care better one e-Patient at a time.

7a4e4-maryoonerose

⁉️ Cushing’s Myths and Facts: Cushing’s is RARE, No one has Cushing’s!

Myth: “Cushing’s is RARE”, “No one has Cushing’s!”, “It is literally impossible for you to have Cushing’s Disease!”

myth-busted

Fact: We have all been guilty of referring to Cushing’s as a “Rare” disease. I*, myself, say this all the time. In fact, the statistics state that only about 2 in every million people are afflicted with this disease. However, these are documented cases.

In reality, Cushing’s is not as rare as we once thought. The fact is that Cushing’s is just rarely diagnosed! Non-experts tend to not test accurately and adequately for Cushing’s.

With an inappropriate protocol for testing, the prevalence of accurate diagnoses decreases. Cushing’s experts DO understand how extensive and difficult the diagnostic process is, so they tend to be more deliberate and thorough when exploring possible Cushing’s in their patients. Cushing’s patients who cycle also have to be more persistent in asking for adequate testing so that they are appropriately diagnosed.

The following video is an accurate portrayal of what many patients experience when trying to get help for their symptoms:

Please review the following links:
http://home.comcast.net/~staticnrg/Cushings/LimitationsSC_UFC_dex_mildCS.pdf
http://survivethejourney.blogspot.com/2008/11/new-research-has-shown-cushings.html

* Dr. Karen Ternier Thames

🦓 Day 1: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2020

April is always Cushing’s Awareness Challenge month because Dr. Harvey Cushing was born on April 8th, 1869.

30-posts

Thanks to Robin for this wonderful past logo!  I’ve participated in these 30 days for Cushing’s Awareness several times so I’m not quite sure what is left to say this year but I always want to get the word out when I can.

As I see it, there have been some strides the diagnosis or treatment of Cushing’s since last year.  More drug companies are getting involved, more doctors seem to be willing to test, a bit more awareness, maybe.

 


April Fool's Day

How fitting that this challenge should begin on April Fool’s Day.  So much of Cushing’s  Syndrome/Disease makes us Cushies seem like we’re the April Fool.  Maybe, just maybe, it’s the doctors who are the April Fools…

Doctors tell us Cushing’s is too rare – you couldn’t possibly have it.  April Fools!

All you have to do is exercise and diet.  You’ll feel better.  April Fools!

Those bruises on your legs?  You’re just clumsy. April Fools!

Sorry you’re growing all that hair on your chin.  That happens as you age, you know.  April Fools!

Did you say you sleep all day?  You’re just lazy.  If you exercised more, you’d have more energy. April Fools!

You don’t have stretch marks.  April Fools!

You have stretch marks but they are the wrong [color/length/direction] April Fools!

The hump on the back of your neck is from your poor posture. April Fools!

Your MRI didn’t show a tumor.  You couldn’t have Cushing’s. April Fools!

This is all in your mind.  Take this prescription for antidepressants and go home.  April Fools!

If you have this one surgery, your life will get back to normal within a few months. April Fools!

What?  You had transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing’s?  You wasted your time and money. April Fools!

I am the doctor.  I know everything.  Do not try to find out any information online. You could not have Cushing’s.  It’s too rare…  April FOOL!

All this reminds me of a wonderful video a message board member posted a while ago:

 

 

So now – who is the April Fool?  It wasn’t me.  Don’t let it be you, either!

🎬 Video: Taylor Davis Spreads Awareness about Cushing’s Disease

 

FLORENCE, SC (WBTW) – 21-year-old Taylor Davis, spent nearly three years battling a mysterious illness called Cushing’s Disease.

“I could barely walk to class anymore. I was in pain. I gained like 70 pounds, despite extreme dieting and exercising,” said Davis.

When Davis enrolled into her spring semester classes at USC, she started experiencing several symptoms.

“I noticed my grades started to take a fall and I was like ok something is seriously wrong here because I’ve never had trouble in school and I could stay up studying all night long and not remember anything the next day,” said Davis.

Davis went from doctor to doctor, but no one could figure out what was wrong with her.

“I thought I was going crazy. Every doctor would say keep trying to diet and exercise and we’ll get you on some medication for your depression and your anxiety,” said Davis.

After dropping out of USC and spending time in the emergency room, a Cushing’s Disease Facebook group led her to a research doctor in California.

“Around October is when the doctor officially diagnosed me and within a month I had my brain surgery scheduled,” said Davis.

Fast forward a couple months later, Davis is thankful to share her experiences on social media and help others going through the same disease.

“I post about it all the time and by using the hashtags for Cushing’s disease, I probably get three to four messages a day from people all over the world. I’ve had people message me in Spanish and I have to use google translate to try and help them,” said Davis.

From https://www.wbtw.com/news/a-woman-in-the-pee-dee-spreads-awareness-on-mysterious-disease/

🎬 Video: Pituitary tumors: Mayo Clinic Radio

 

This interview originally aired July 6, 2019.  Dr. William Young Jr., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, discussed pituitary gland tumors.

The pituitary gland is a hormone-producing gland at the base of the brain. Sometimes known as the “master gland,” the pituitary gland produces and regulates hormones that help the body function. Pituitary tumors are abnormal growths that develop in your pituitary gland.

Some pituitary tumors result in too many of the hormones that regulate important functions of your body. Some pituitary tumors can cause your pituitary gland to produce lower levels of hormones. Most pituitary tumors are noncancerous (benign) growths that remain in your pituitary gland or surrounding tissues, and don’t spread to other parts of your body. There are various options for treating pituitary tumors, including removing the tumor, controlling its growth and managing your hormone levels with medications. Your health care provider also may recommend a wait-and-see approach.

🎬 Video: Cushing’s Syndrome – Story of a Patient

Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disease which affects 65 patients in one million inhabitants of the EU. Cushing’s syndrome is a state where the body is chronically exposed to a high concentration of cortisol.

The signs of the disease are often overlooked. It took 14 years to diagnose Ida with the disease and to start treating it successfully. On Cushing’s Awareness Day, Ida emphasizes the importance of communication between the patient and the doctor.

🎬 VIDEO: ‘Subclinical’ Cushing’s syndrome needs new name

In this video exclusive, Endocrine Today Editorial Board Member Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, professor of neurological surgery and professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and clinical nutrition in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University and director of the OHSU Northwest Pituitary Center, discusses why mild Cushing’s syndrome matters.

In the past mild autonomous Cushing’s has been referred to as “subclinical Cushing’s syndrome.”

“What is subclinical about a patient that has, for example, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis?” Fleseriu said.

She describes how to screen for and treat mild Cushing’s syndrome in patients with adrenal incidentalomas.

Watch the video for more.  If it doesn’t show up, please click here.

From Helio