🏞 Rebuilding the MemberMap

Slowly but surely, we’re rebuilding the Cushing’s Member Map. The location where we hosted it previously started charging huge amounts of money, so it’s being moved here.

Add your information (or your doctor’s) at https://cushingsbios.com/2018/10/28/we-have-a-new-bio-form/ or below:

 

 

🎤 Archived Interview: Monica, pituitary survivor

 

Listen as Monica (Monicaroni) talks about the challenges she’s faced maintaining her music career while in testing and treatment. Monica was diagnosed with Cyclical Cushing’s. She had pituitary surgery in November 2006. An 8mm encapsulated pituitary tumor was removed. Since there was no post-op crash, she also had a BLA in December 2006.

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/05/02/interview-with-monica-pituitary-survivor

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Cushing’s Myths and Facts: “Men1 and Men2 are the only genetic causes of Cushing’s”

Myth: “Men1 and Men2 are the only genetic causes of Cushing’s”

myth-busted

FACT: This is a Myth. More current research has explored multiple etiologies of Cushing’s. It was once thought that heredity had no influence on the development of Cushing’s Syndrome/Disease and our knowledge was once limited in this sense. Researchers have done more work in terms of exploring genetic factors in the onset of this disease. *~Robin Ess (Cushing’s educator and advocate)

The following causes for Cushing’s have all been explored:

1. Men 1

2. Men2

3. FIPA

4. CAH/BAH

5. PRKAR1A(protein kinase,cAMP-dependent, regulatory, type I, ? gene)

http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/564106_2

6.(PDE11A)

http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/564106_4

http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/564106_6

7.PRKACA

http://www.nature.com/nrendo/journal/v10/n8/pdf/nrendo.2014.89.pdf?WT.ec_id=NRENDO-201408

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24700472

http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v46/n6/full/ng.2956.html

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/exome-sequencing-study-narrows-new-cushings-syndrome-gene-culprit

8.ARMC5

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141013090455.htm

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1304603

Day 18: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2019

Cushie Crusader, that’s me…and many others.  I think we all have an opportunity to be Cushie Crusaders every time we tell others about our illness, share our story on or offline, post about our struggles – and triumphs – on the message boards, write blog posts in this Cushing’s Awareness Challenge…

I have brochures printed up that I’ll sometimes give to people who look like they might need the info.  My husband carries business cards since he’s getting pretty good at recognizing Cushies.  Robin made a great information card that anyone can print out and share with others.

When we have prayer time in my handbell practice or choir rehearsals I try to mention issues that are going on in the Cushing’s community.  People are slowly but steadily learning about Cushing’s week by week.

A piano student mentioned that a person in a group she is in has Cushing’s, a non-Cushie friend mentioned last week that she had gone with a friend of hers to an endo appointment to discuss Cushing’s.

Get out there and talk about Cushing’s.  Let people know that it’s not just for dogs and horses (and sometimes ferrets)!

After you’ve been diagnosed, don’t just forget all about Cushing’s – stick around the boards and help others who are just getting started.

Here’s something I had made for Sue with SuperSue embroidered on the back.

Picture your name instead:

⁉️ Cushing’s Myths and Facts: UFC’s are the Gold Standard for Cushing’s testing

Myth: UFC’s are the Gold Standard for Cushing’s testing

myth-busted

Fact: UFC stands for Urinary Free Cortisol. In layman’s terms this test assesses cortisol by collecting urine for 24 hours. It was once thought that this was the gold standard and the end all and be all in terms of assessing Cushing’s in a patient. What we now know is that this is not necessarily true. Though this test is helpful in assessing for Cushing’s in some patients, not all patients have positive labs with this test, even if they DO, in fact, have Cushing’s.

There are various theories as to why. Cyclical Cushing’s patients also tend to report having a lower prevalence of positive UFCs in their test batteries.

Cushing’s experts understand that the most effective way to test for Cushing’s, especially in cases where it is suspected that the patient is cycling, is to administer multiple test measures across an extended period of time.

The following links may be helpful:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2978784/

http://home.comcast.net/~staticnrg/Cushing’s/LimitationsSC_UFC_dex_mildCS.pdf

http://survivethejourney.blogspot.com/2008/08/when-gold-standard-becomes-tarnished.html

 

Dr. Karen Thames has been sharing these on her Facebook Page, Empowering People with Invisible Chronic Illness – The EPIC Foundation

She has graciously given me permission to share them here and in the CushieWiki and on the Cushing’s Help message boards.

🦓 Day 17: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2019

I used to carry a print out of this everywhere I go because I find it very soothing.  This print out was in a plastic page saver. On the other side there is a Psalm 116, part of the post from Day Fifteen of the 2018 Cushing’s Challenge.

These days, both these readings are available on my phone and iPad.

I first read this in Chicken Soup for the Surviving Soul and is posted several places online.

The Best Day Of My Life
by Gregory M Lousignont

Today, when I awoke, I suddenly realized that this is the best day of my life, ever! There were times when I wondered if I would make it to today; but I did! And because I did I’m going to celebrate!

Today, I’m going to celebrate what an unbelievable life I have had so far: the accomplishments, the many blessings, and, yes, even the hardships because they have served to make me stronger.

I will go through this day with my head held high, and a happy heart. I will marvel at God’s seemingly simple gifts: the morning dew, the sun, the clouds, the trees, the flowers, the birds. Today, none of these miraculous creations will escape my notice.

Today, I will share my excitement for life with other people. I’ll make someone smile. I’ll go out of my way to perform an unexpected act of kindness for someone I don’t even know.

Today, I’ll give a sincere compliment to someone who seems down. I’ll tell a child how special he is, and I’ll tell someone I love just how deeply I care for her and how much she means to me.

Today is the day I quit worrying about what I don’t have and start being grateful for all the wonderful things God has already given me.

I’ll remember that to worry is just a waste of time because my faith in God and his Divine Plan ensures everything will be just fine.

And tonight, before I go to bed, I’ll go outside and raise my eyes to the heavens. I will stand in awe at the beauty of the stars and the moon, and I will praise God for these magnificent treasures.

As the day ends and I lay my head down on my pillow, I will thank the Almighty for the best day of my life. And I will sleep the sleep of a contented child, excited with expectation because know tomorrow is going to be the best day of my life, ever!

 

When I’m feeling down, depressed or low, reading my 2 special pages can help me more than anything else.

 

🎤Archived Interview: Terry G, pituitary patient

Terry (Terry) is a long time pituitary Cushing’s survivor.

Terry had a pituitary surgery (in LA) in October of 2003 which did not cure her Cushing’s Disease. Then, Dec 13th, 2003 she had her BLA in a Wisconsin hospital. She also had an infection in her sphenoid sinus. It originated at the site of her pituitary surgery from October 2003. She had to be on a lot of antibiotics and narcotic pain relievers.

In Sept 2005 the surgeon removed the infection from one area, making another area clear…..

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/04/17/interview-with-terry-g-pituitary-patient

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🦓 Day 16: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2019

So often during the diagnosis phase of Cushing’s I felt like this picture – I was walking alone to an unknown place with an unknown future.

My diagnosis was pre-Internet which meant that any information had to be gotten from libraries, bookstores, magazines…or doctors.  In 1983 to 1986 I knew something was terribly wrong but there was no backup from doctors, family or friends.  My first hope was from a magazine (see Day Twenty-nine, 2016)

After I got that first glimmer of hope, it was off to the library to try to understand medical texts.  I would pick out words I did understand – and it was more words each trip.  I made Xerox copies of my findings to read at home and try to digest. (I still have all those old pages!)

All my research led me to Cushing’s.

Unfortunately, the research didn’t lead me to doctors who could help for several years.  That contributed greatly to the loneliness.  If a Doctor says you’re not sick, friends and family are going to believe the doctor, not you.  After all, he’s the one trained to know what’s wrong or find out.

I was so grateful when I finally got into a clinical trial at NIH and was so nice not to be alone with this mystery illness.  I was also surprised to learn, awful as I felt, there were Cushies much worse off than I was.

I am so glad that the Internet is here now helping us all know that we’re not alone anymore.

 

We’re all in this together with help, support, research, just being there.  I love this quote from Catherine at http://wheniwasyou.wordpress.com/2012/03/31/wheniwasyou/

Mary, I am delighted to see you here. Cushings – because of the persistent central obesity caused by (we know now) the lack of growth hormone plus the hypothyroidism I was diagnosed with (but for which treatment was ineffective due to my lack of cortisol) – was one of the things I considered as an explanation for my symptoms. Your site was enormously educational and helpful to me in figuring out what might be happening to me. Those other patient testimonies I referred to? Many of them were the bios you posted. Thank you so much for commenting. I am so grateful for the support and encouragement. I really hope that my experiences will help other undiagnosed hypopituitary patients find their way to a diagnosis. I often used to dream that one day I’d get to say to others what was so often said to me: don’t give up, there will be an answer. I kept believing in myself because people I hadn’t even met believed in me. Now I am finally here and I do hope my story will help others to have faith in their own instincts.

Thanks again. Please do keep in touch.

Catherine