📅 Tenth Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day

Join us on Saturday, October 13, 2018

10th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day
Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Location:
Johns Hopkins Mt. Washington Conference Center
5801 Smith Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21209
map and directions

Attendance and parking are free, but seating is limited. Reserve your space now: Please R.S.V.P. by email (preferred) to PituitaryDay@jhmi.edu  or by calling 410-670-7259.

Agenda

9:00 – 9:25 a.m.: Registration

9:25 – 9:30 a.m.: Welcome and acknowledgments (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.)

9:30 – 10:00 a.m.: Symptoms of Pituitary Tumors: Acromegaly, Cushing, and Non-Functioning Masses (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.)

10:00 – 10:30 a.m.: Effects of Pituitary Tumors on Vision (Amanda Henderson, M.D.)

10:30 – 11:00 a.m.: A Patient’s Story (to be announced)

11:00 – 11:30 a.m.: The Nose: the Door to Access the Pituitary Gland (Murray Ramanathan, M.D.)

11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Surgery for Pituitary Tumors: Images from the Operating Room (Gary Gallia, M.D., Ph.D.)

12:00 – 12:30 p.m.: Radiation Therapy for Cushing, Acromegaly and Non-Functioning Tumors: When Needed, A Good Option (Kristin Redmond, M.D.)

12:30 – 1:25 p.m.: Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Round Table Discussions:

  1. Acromegaly
  2. Cushing Disease
  3. Non-Functioning Adenomas
  4. Craniopharyngiomas and Rathke’s Cysts

 

📞 Webinar: Preserving Function in Pituitary Surgery

Presented By

Daniel Prevedello, MD

Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery
Director, Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program
Co-Director, Comprehensive Skull Base Center at The James
Director, Pituitary Surgery Program
The Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University

After registering you will receive a confirmation email with details about joining the webinar.

Contact us at webinar@pituitary.org with any questions or suggestions.

Date: May 8, 2018

Time: 3:00 – 4:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 6:00 – 7:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

Webinar Information:

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of gland function preservation during pituitary surgery.
  • Understand the importance of preserving nose function related to the approach.
  • Understand the importance of team work in pituitary surgery

Presenter Bio

Dr. Prevedello is a professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery, and the director for the Minimally Invasive Cranial Surgery Program. He is one of only a few neurosurgeons in the world who have performed more than 1,000 Endoscopic Endonasal Approach (EEA) cases. EEA is a minimally invasive surgery technique that gives surgeons access to the base of the skull, intracranial cavity and top of the spine by operating through the nose and paranasal sinuses. Dr. Prevedello was rated in the top 10 percent of physicians in the nation for patient satisfaction in 2016 and 2017.

Dr. Prevedello’s current research focus is on developing minimally invasive approaches to the brain and skull base that will result in the best surgical tumor resection possible with the least amount of disruption to normal tissue. Finding a patient treatment option that reduces the amount of long-term consequences for patients and their families is always his top priority.

Dr. Prevedello’s medical journey began in Brazil, where he attended medical school and finished his residency in 2005. He completed fellowships in neuroendocrine and pituitary surgery at the University of Virginia, and another in skull base and cerebrovascular surgery at the University of Pittsburgh.

🎤 Archived Interview with Katie (kvb927)

 

Katie’s short bio: Symptoms started in 2002 at age 22, or before. Jan. 2008 – 2 mm. area of differential enhancement on right pituitary and 11 mm. pineal cyst identified by MRI Jan. 2008 – DX – hypothalamic amenorrhea Mar. 2008 – DX – pituitary adenoma, hypogonadism – female Katie will be an officer in the upcoming Cushing’s Help Organization.

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/07/24/interview-with-katie-kvb927

 

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🎤 Archived Interview with Kate (Fairley)

 

Kate (Fairley), July 17, 2008. Kate had symptoms since 1991. She had two pituitary surgeries and another recurrence. She is not yet cured and her current diagnoses are Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension, panhypopituitarism and a CSF leak. She has appeared on National Geographic TV in the Science of Obesity.

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/07/17/interview-with-kate-fairley

Sadly, Kate was only 46 when she died on June 23, 2014.  Her bio and video can be found here: https://cushingsbios.com/2015/06/23/1623/

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🎤 Archived Interview with Donna Sellers, Mother of a Cushing’s patient

 

Donna Sellers, President, John’s Foundation for Cushing’s Awareness, mother of a Cushing’s patient.

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/06/19/interview-with-donna-sellers-mother-of-a-cushings-patient

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🦓 Day 25: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2018

Over the years, we went on several Windjammer Barefoot Cruises.  We liked them because they were small, casual and were fairly easy on the wallet.

They sailed around the Caribbean to a variety of islands, although they sometimes changed itineraries depending on weather, crew, whatever.  One trip we were supposed to go to Saba but couldn’t make port.  A lot of people got off at the next port and flew home.

The captains were prone to “Bedtime Stories” which were often more fiction than true but they added to the appeal of the trip.  We didn’t care if we missed islands or not – we were just there to sail over the waves and enjoy the ride.

The last trip we took with them was about two years before I started having Cushing’s problems.  (You wondered how I was going to tie this together, right?)

The cruise was uneventful, other than the usual mishaps like hitting docks, missing islands and so on.  Until it was a particularly rough sea one day.  I was walking somewhere on deck and suddenly a wave came up over the deck making it very slippery.  I fell and cracked the back of my head on the curved edge of a table in the dining area.  I had the next-to-the-worse headache I have ever had, the worst being after my pituitary surgery. At least after the surgery, I got some morphine.

We asked several doctors later if that hit could have contributed to my Cushing’s but doctors didn’t want to get involved in that at all.

The Windjammer folks didn’t fare much better, either. In October 1998, Hurricane Mitch was responsible for the loss of the s/v Fantome (the last one we were on).

All 31 crew members aboard perished; passengers and other crew members had earlier been offloaded in Belize.

The story was recorded in the book The Ship and the Storm: Hurricane Mitch and the Loss of the Fantome by Jim Carrier.  The ship, which was sailing in the center of the hurricane, experienced up to 50-foot (15 m) waves and over 100 mph (160 km/h) winds, causing the Fantome to founder off the coast of Honduras.

This event was similar to the Perfect Storm in that the weather people were more interested in watching the hurricane change directions than they were in people who were dealing with its effects.

I read this book and I was really moved by the plight of those crew members.

I’ll never know if that hit on my head contributed to my Cushing’s but I have seen several people mention on the message boards that they had a traumatic head injury of some type in their earlier lives.

🎤 Archived Interview with Heather S, Pituitary Cushing’s Survivor

 

Heather, pituitary surgery on January 18, 2006 after years of medical problems, June 5, 7:30PM

 

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/06/05/interview-with-heather-s-pituitary-cushings-survivor

 

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