👥 Register for Johns Hopkins Pituitary Day October 19, 2019!

The 11th annual Pituitary Day will take place on October 19, 2019  Patients living with pituitary disorders can hear lectures from our pituitary specialists, see movies of pituitary surgeries and hear from other patients about their experience living with pituitary disease and undergoing surgery.

Attendance is free, and patients can bring one guest.

Call 410-955-3921 or reserve your spot by email at pituitaryday@jmhi.edu

More information at www.hopkinsmedicine.org/neurology_neurosurgery/centers_clinics/pituitary_center/index.html

🎤Archived Interview: Kate (Fairley)

 

Kate (Fairley), July 17, 2008. Kate had symptoms since 1991. She had two pituitary surgeries and another recurrence. She is not yet cured and her current diagnoses are Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension, panhypopituitarism and a CSF leak. She has appeared on National Geographic TV in the Science of Obesity.

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/07/17/interview-with-kate-fairley

Sadly, Kate was only 46 when she died on June 23, 2014.  Her bio and video can be found here: https://cushingsbios.com/2015/06/23/1623/

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🎤 Archived Interview: Dr. Dori Middleman, Pituitary Cushing’s Survivor

 

Dr. Dori Middleman is a Psychophamacologist, Certified Gestalt Psychotherapist and Cushing’s Patient.

She has had both pituitary surgery and two gamma knife radiosurgeries.

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/06/12/dr-dori-middleman-pituitary-cushings-survivor

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📞 Webinar: Does Extent of Resection Matter in Pituitary Surgery?

 

Presented By

Jamie J. Van Gompel, MD, FAANS
Associate Professor in Neurosurgery and Otorhinolaryngology
Program Director, Vice Chair of Education, Department of Neurologic Surgery
Associate Program Director, Neurosurgical Skull Base Oncology Fellowship
Program Director, International Neurosurgery Fellowship
Mayo Clinic – Rochester, MN

and

Garret W. Choby, MD
Rhinologist
Endoscopic Skull Base Surgeon
Mayo Clinic – Rochester, MN

Register here

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

If you have any questions or suggestions please feel free to contact webinar@pituitary.org

DATE: Wednesday, March 13, 2019
TIME: 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM Central Daylight Time, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM EDT

Webinar Description

Does Extent of Resection Matter in Pituitary Surgery and Postoperative Nasal Care

Presenter Bios

Jamie J. Van Gompel MD(Honors), BS(Honors) is an Associate professor in neurosurgery and Otolaryngology specializing in endoscopic/open skull base at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA. He completed his undergraduate and medical school training at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He has worked at the NIH as well as completed a Howard Hughes Fellowship studying neuroendocrine tumors. His neurosurgical training was undertaken at the Mayo Clinic and he went on to complete a complex cranial fellowship under the tutelage of Dr. Harry van Loveren at the University of South Florida. Currently, He is the Education Vice Chair, Program Director of the Neurosurgery Program and Associate Program Director of the Skull Base Oncology program. Further manages a busy skull base oncology and pituitary practice in addition to performing research with Active NIH U and R funding. He has authored over 150 publications of which over 30 are pertinent to pituitary pathologies and endoscopic surgery.

Garret W. Choby, M.D., is a fellowship-trained rhinologist and endoscopic skull base surgeon practicing at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. He completed his residency training at the University of Pittsburgh and his fellowship training at Stanford University. Dr. Choby works closely with his neurosurgical partners to treat a variety of pituitary and cranial base tumors. His primary research interests include improving oncologic and quality of life outcomes for patients undergoing endonasal tumor resection and tailoring individualized treatment for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

💉 Helpful Doctors: New Jersey

James K. Liu, MD
Professor of Neurosurgery
Director of Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery
Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School
RWJ Barnabas Health

Dr. James K. Liu is the Director of Cerebrovascular, Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery at the Rutgers Neurological Institute of New Jersey, and Professor of Neurological Surgery at Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School. He is board certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and has a robust pituitary tumor practice at University Hospital and Saint Barnabas Medical Center.

Dr. Liu graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with Phi Beta Kappa honors, and obtained his MD from New York Medical College with AOA honors. After completing a neurosurgery residency at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, he was awarded the Dandy Clinical Fellowship by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and obtained advanced fellowship training in Skull Base, Cerebrovascular Surgery & Neuro-oncology at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland.

Dr. Liu is renowned for his comprehensive treatment of complex brain tumors and skull base lesions, including pituitary tumors, acoustic neuromas, meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, chordomas, and jugular foramen tumors. His robust clinical practice encompasses both traditional open and minimally invasive endoscopic endonasal skull base approaches. He also specializes in microsurgery of cerebrovascular diseases including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), cavernous malformations, and carotid artery stenosis. He also has expertise in cerebrovascular bypass procedures for moya moya disease, carotid artery occlusion, vertebral artery occlusion, complex aneurysms and skull base tumors, as well as endoscopic-assisted microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm.

As one of the most active researchers in his field, Dr. Liu has published extensively with over 250 peer-reviewed publications and 25 textbook chapters. He has taught many hands-on cadaver dissection courses in skull base surgery and has lectured extensively nationally and internationally throughout North America, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Dr. Liu’s research is focused on the development of innovative and novel skull base and endoscopic techniques, quantitative surgical neuroanatomy, microsurgical and microvascular anastomosis skills training, virtual surgical simulation, pituitary tumor biology, and clinical outcomes after skull base and cerebrovascular surgery.

Dr. Liu is an active member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, North American Skull Base Society, Pituitary Network Association, The Facial Pain (Trigeminal Neuralgia) Association, AANS/CNS Cerebrovascular Section, Tumor Section. He serves on the medical advisory board of the Acoustic Neuroma Association of New Jersey, and is the current Secretary-Treasurer of the International Meningioma Society.

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✍️ Day 22: 40 Days of Thankfulness

 

Today is the 31st anniversary of my pituitary surgery at NIH.

As one can imagine, it hasn’t been all happiness and light.  Most of my journey has been documented here and on the message boards – and elsewhere around the web.

My Cushing’s has been in remission for most of these 31 years.  Due to scarring from my pituitary surgery, I developed adrenal insufficiency.

I took growth hormone for a while.

When I got kidney cancer, I had to stop the GH, even though no doctor would admit to any connection between the two.

Last year I went back on it (Omnitrope this time) in late June.  Hooray!  I still don’t know if it’s going to work but I have high hopes.  I am posting some of how that’s going here.

During nephrectomy, doctors removed my left kidney, my adrenal gland, and some lymph nodes.  Thankfully, the cancer was contained – but my adrenal insufficiency is even more severe than it was.

In the last couple years, I’ve developed ongoing knee issues.  Because of my cortisol use to keep the AI at bay, my endocrinologist doesn’t want me to get a cortisone injection in my knee.  September 12, 2018 I did get that knee injection (Kenalog)  and it’s been one of the best things I ever did.  I’m not looking forward to telling my endo!

I also developed an allergy to blackberries in October and had to take Prednisone – and I’ll have to tell my endo that, too!

My mom has moved in with us, bring some challenges…

But, this is a post about Giving Thanks.  The series will be continued on this blog unless I give thanks about something else Cushing’s related 🙂

I am so thankful that in 1987 the NIH existed and that my endo knew enough to send me there.

I am thankful for Dr. Ed Oldfield, my pituitary neurosurgeon at NIH.  Unfortunately, Dr. Oldfield died in the last year.

I’m thankful for Dr. Harvey Cushing and all the work he did.  Otherwise, I might be the fat lady in Ringling Brothers now.

To be continued in the following days here at http://www.maryo.co/

 

📅 Tenth Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day

Join us on Saturday, October 13, 2018

10th Annual Johns Hopkins Pituitary Patient Day
Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Location:
Johns Hopkins Mt. Washington Conference Center
5801 Smith Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21209
map and directions

Attendance and parking are free, but seating is limited. Reserve your space now: Please R.S.V.P. by email (preferred) to PituitaryDay@jhmi.edu  or by calling 410-670-7259.

Agenda

9:00 – 9:25 a.m.: Registration

9:25 – 9:30 a.m.: Welcome and acknowledgments (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.)

9:30 – 10:00 a.m.: Symptoms of Pituitary Tumors: Acromegaly, Cushing, and Non-Functioning Masses (Roberto Salvatori, M.D.)

10:00 – 10:30 a.m.: Effects of Pituitary Tumors on Vision (Amanda Henderson, M.D.)

10:30 – 11:00 a.m.: A Patient’s Story (to be announced)

11:00 – 11:30 a.m.: The Nose: the Door to Access the Pituitary Gland (Murray Ramanathan, M.D.)

11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Surgery for Pituitary Tumors: Images from the Operating Room (Gary Gallia, M.D., Ph.D.)

12:00 – 12:30 p.m.: Radiation Therapy for Cushing, Acromegaly and Non-Functioning Tumors: When Needed, A Good Option (Kristin Redmond, M.D.)

12:30 – 1:25 p.m.: Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Round Table Discussions:

  1. Acromegaly
  2. Cushing Disease
  3. Non-Functioning Adenomas
  4. Craniopharyngiomas and Rathke’s Cysts