😎 Letter to Cushies

Originally posted on Facebook​​​​​​​

To all my Cushie friends who are still dealing with this horrible disease, keep fighting, don’t ever give up, you will get better.  I told a very close friend of mine the other day, if I had the power I would heal everyone you today.  Cushing’s is a horrible disease, and unless you have been through it there is no way anyone could ever understand it.

After a year and a half  since my BLA and I am the healthiest, happiest person I have been in a very long time.  I am working out with a personal trainer once a week because I am determined to regain the strength I lost due to having Cushing’s for six very long years.   I have a long way to go and it is not going to happen overnight but it will happen.

I live each day to the absolute fullest and enjoy every minute of every day, I am so grateful to have made it through to the other side, not without some emotional and physical scars, but I made it none the less.

I think about and pray for all of you every day because without your knowledge and support I don’t know that I would have made it.

To those of you who are still on the boards please feel free to share this post and my story to everyone there.  I am sorry I don’t go on the boards any more, but as I said I didn’t make through without some emotional scars.

I love you all, god bless and be good to yourself always.

A Cushing’s Collection: A Humorous Journey Surviving Cushing’s Disease, Diabetes Insipidus, and a Bilateral Adrenalectomy

 

The author of this book has submitted a bio and is a member of the Cushing’s Help message boards.

From Amazon:

Diagnosed with a rare disease that only affects between two and ten people per million, Marie Conley used emails to communicate with family, friends, and co-workers to keep them apprised of the diagnosis and prognosis of Cushing’s disease and the many complications she experienced on this journey. Her ironic humor and raw, emotional approach helps bring hope to those touched by this rare and unrelenting disease.

In her mid-thirties, Conley, who strived to keep herself healthy while maintaining the delicate balance of raising a young child, keeping a home, and a demanding career, began to experience a variety of unexplained maladies inconsistent with her life style.Because of the elusive nature of Cushing’s disease, the treatment is a long and complicated process of trial and error.

At this time, there is no cure, largely due to the fact that Cushing’s disease is considered an “orphan disease.” As is her nature, she has decided to “adopt” this “orphan” and is doing everything she can to bring awareness to this disease.Conley’s tenacious spirit and determination would not allow this insidious disease to triumph over her life. Armed with her laptop as the only weapon available in the sterility of the recovery room, the author attacks the keyboard with a vengeance to let friends and family know that in this battle, there is no surrender.

Interview with Sheryl (sherylr)

Sheryl talked about what it’s been like living with Addison’s after a BLA – for over 30 years.

Read Sheryl’s bio at https://cushingsbios.com/2017/05/21/sheryl-adrenal-patient/

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/08/07/interview-with-ashleigh-marinewife05

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Myth: “Each Person Requires the Same Dose of Steroid in Order to Survive…

Myth: “Each person requires the same dose of steroid in order to survive with Secondary or Primary Adrenal Insufficiency”

myth-busted

Fact: In simple terms, Adrenal Insufficiency occurs when the body does not have enough cortisol in it. You see, cortisol is life sustaining and we actually do need cortisol to survive. You have probably seen the commercials about “getting rid of extra belly fat” by lowering your cortisol. These advertisements make it hard for people to actually understand the importance of the function of cortisol.

After a Cushing’s patient has surgery, he/she goes from having very high levels of cortisol to no cortisol at all. For pituitary patients, the pituitary, in theory, should start working eventually again and cause the adrenal glands to produce enough cortisol. However, in many cases; the pituitary gland does not resume normal functioning and leaves a person adrenally insufficient. The first year after pit surgery is spent trying to get that hormone to regulate on its own normally again. For a patient who has had a Bilateral Adrenalectomy (BLA), where both adrenal glands are removed as a last resort to “cure” Cushing’s; his/her body will not produce cortisol at all for his/her life. This causes Primary Adrenal Insufficiency.

All Cushing’s patients spend time after surgery adjusting medications and weaning slowly from steroid (cortisol) to get the body to a maintenance dose, which is the dose that a “normal” body produces. This process can be a very long one. Once on maintenance, a patient’s job is not over. He/She has to learn what situations require even more cortisol. You see, cortisol is the stress hormone and also known as the Fight or Flight hormone. Its function is to help a person respond effectively to stress and cortisol helps the body compensate for both physical and emotional stress. So, when faced with a stressor, the body will produce 10X the baseline levels in order to compensate. When a person can not produce adequate amounts of cortisol to compensate, we call that Adrenal Insufficiency. If it gets to the point of an “Adrenal Crisis”, this means that the body can no longer deal and will go into shock unless introduced to extremely high levels of cortisol, usually administered through an emergency shot of steroid.

There are ways to help prevent a crisis, by taking more steroid than the maintenance dose during times of stress. This can be anything from going to a family function (good stress counts too) to fighting an infection or illness. Acute stressors such as getting into a car accident or sometimes even having a really bad fight require more cortisol as well.

It was once believed that everyone responded to every stressor in the exact same way. So, there are general guidelines about how much more cortisol to introduce to the body during certain stressors. For instance, during infection, a patient should take 2-3X the maintenance dose of steroid (cortisol). Also, even the maintenance dose was considered the same for everyone. Now a days, most doctors will say that 20 mg of Hydrocortisone (Steroid/Cortisol) is the appropriate maintenance dose for EVERYONE. Now, we know that neither is necessarily true. Although the required maintenance dose is about the same for everyone; some patients require less and some require more. I have friends who will go into an adrenal crisis if they take LESS than 30 mg of daily steroid. On the other hand, 30 mg may be way too much for some and those folks may even require LESS daily steroid, like 15 mg. Also, I want to stress (no pun intended) that different stressors affect different people differently. For some, for instance, an acute scare may not affect them. However, for others, receiving bad news or being in shock WILL put their bodies into crisis. That person must then figure out how much additional steroid is needed.

Each situation is different and each time may be different. Depending on the stressor, a person may need just a little more cortisol or a lot. Every person must, therefore, learn their own bodies when dealing with Adrenal Insufficiency. This is VERY important! I learned this the hard way. As a Clinical Psychologist; I assumed that my “coping skills” would be enough to prevent a stressor from putting me into crisis. That was FAR from the truth! I have learned that I can not necessarily prevent my body’s physiological response to stress. People often ask me, “BUT you are a psychologist! Shouldn’t you be able to deal with stress?!!!!” What they don’t realize is that my BODY is the one that has to do the job of compensating. Since my body can not produce cortisol at all, my job is to pay close attention to it so that I can take enough steroid to respond to any given situation. We all have to do that. We all have to learn our own bodies. This is vitally important and will save our lives!

To those we have lost in our community to Adrenal Insufficiency after treatment of Cushing’s, Rest in Peace my friends! Your legacies live on forever!

~ By Karen Ternier Thames

Interview with Jackie (samsmom) & Jordan

 

 

Jackie (samsmom) & Jordan: Cushing’s in young people, the fight to diagnose, the amazing gift of a GOOD endocrinologist. Jackie has appeared on Discovery Health discussing her fight for a cure for her younger daughter, as well. Later, the gene responsible for Sam’s illness was found. Her father carried the gene as did her two sisters. Jordan, Jackie’s oldest daughter, has recently had her adrenals removed.

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/05/15/interview-with-jackie-samsmon-jordan

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Interview with Monica’s Husband Kevin, about Caretakers

 

Monica’s husband Kevin, April 24. Talking about Cushing’s from the spouse/caretaker point of view He is also Monica’s producer/ manager. He has been a tour manager and sound engineer in the music industry his whole life and has worked with many of the greats in the industry. For the two years during Monica’s diagnosis and surgeries he worked from home as a computer programmer so that he could take care of Monica. Monica and Kevin were married two years ago, just before Monica’s pituitary surgery

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/04/24/interview-with-monicas-husband-kevin-about-caretakers

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Interview with Terry G, pituitary patient

Terry (Terry) is a long time pituitary Cushing’s survivor. Terry had a pituitary surgery (in LA) in October of 2003 which did not cure her Cushing’s Disease. Then, Dec 13th, 2003 she had her BLA in a Wisconsin hospital. She also had an infection in her sphenoid sinus. It originated at the site of her pituitary surgery from October 2003. She had to be on a lot of antibiotics and narcotic pain relievers. In Sept 2005 the surgeon remove the infection from one area, making another area clear…..

Listen at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/04/17/interview-with-terry-g-pituitary-patient

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