💉 Helpful Doctors: Ohio

 

Many people on the message boards see Dr. Kirschner.  Here’s a short adrenal video:

 

 

When it comes to adrenal cancer care, expertise is critical. The James at Ohio State expert Dr. Lawrence Kirschner explains what you should look for and why.

The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute is located at 460 W. 10th Ave. on the Ohio State campus. (43210). To learn more about the OSUCCC – James visit: https://cancer.osu.edu/

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Basics: The Pituitary Gland: Small But Mighty

The pituitary gland works hard to keep you healthy, doing everything from ensuring proper bone and muscle growth to helping nursing mothers produce milk for their babies. Its functionality is even more remarkable when you consider the gland is the size of a pea.

“The pituitary is commonly referred to as the ‘master’ gland because it does so many important jobs in the body,” says Karen Frankwich, MD, a board-certified endocrinologist at Mission Hospital. “Not only does the pituitary make its own hormones, but it also triggers hormone production in other glands. The pituitary is aided in its job by the hypothalamus. This part of the brain is situated above the pituitary, and sends messages to the gland on when to release or stimulate production of necessary hormones.”

These hormones include:

  • Growth hormone, for healthy bone and muscle mass
  • Thyroid-stimulating hormone, which signals the thyroid to produce its hormones that govern metabolism and the body’s nervous system, among others
  • Follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones for healthy reproductive systems (including ovarian egg development in women and sperm formation in men, as well as estrogen and testosterone production)
  • Prolactin, for breast milk production in nursing mothers
  • Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), which prompts the adrenal glands to produce the stress hormone cortisol. The proper amount of cortisol helps the body adapt to stressful situations by affecting the immune and nervous systems, blood sugar levels, blood pressure and metabolism.
  • Antidiuretic (ADH), which helps the kidneys control urine levels
  • Oxytocin, which can stimulate labor in pregnant women

The work of the pituitary gland can be affected by non-cancerous tumors called adenomas. “These tumors can affect hormone production, so you have too little or too much of a certain hormone,” Dr. Frankwich says. “Larger tumors that are more than 1 centimeter, called macroadenomas, can also put pressure on the area surrounding the gland, which can lead to vision problems and headaches. Because symptoms can vary depending on the hormone that is affected by a tumor, or sometimes there are no symptoms, adenomas can be difficult to pinpoint. General symptoms can include nausea, weight loss or gain, sluggishness or weakness, and changes in menstruation for women and sex drive for men.”

If there’s a suspected tumor, a doctor will usually run tests on a patient’s blood and urine, and possibly order a brain-imaging scan. An endocrinologist can help guide a patient on the best course of treatment, which could consist of surgery, medication, radiation therapy or careful monitoring of the tumor if it hasn’t caused major disruption.

“The pituitary gland is integral to a healthy, well-functioning body in so many ways,” Dr. Frankwich says. “It may not be a major organ you think about much, but it’s important to know how it works, and how it touches on so many aspects of your health.”

Adapted from http://www.stjhs.org/HealthCalling/2016/December/The-Pituitary-Gland-Small-but-Mighty.aspx

Thoughts? Share on the message boards.

Record a Video and Receive Rarity the Zebra!

Please help us spread the word to other patients and caregivers about Rare Patient Voice by submitting a short video about your experience with us. Using the Storyvine app, recording a video on your phone is quick, easy, and fun! Videos will be featured on our website, on social media, and in newsletters.

Check out and join the growing group of RPV patients and caregivers who have recorded stories! https://rarepatientvoice.com#sharevoice

Follow these steps to record and submit your own video!

Step 1: Scan with code below with the camera app from your Apple/Android mobile device or click the link below!

https://admin.storyvine.com/app_users/sign_up/Sharing_My_Voice

Step 2: Download the Storyvine app from the App Store or Google Play

Step 3: Film and upload your video!

To thank you for recording a video, we will send you a Rarity zebra plushie AND enter you in a raffle to win a $100 Amazon gift card. Congratulations to Stacy of South Carolina, our December 1 raffle winner! Our next raffle will be held in early January.

🎥 Pituitary Tumors and Treatments

Pituitary tumors start in the pituitary gland. They’re usually benign (not cancerous) and rarely spread to other parts of the body.

Dr. Borghei-Razavi discusses pituitary tumors and treatments through minimally invasive surgical approaches offered at Cleveland Clinic Florida.

📽 Video: How an Emergency Injection works!

What should you do if an Addison crisis threatens? How do you prepare an emergency injection and how do you administer it?

If you have a gastrointestinal infection, accompanied by diarrhea and vomiting, there is a big risk of an Addison crisis.

Always discuss with your specialist what you have done and what else needs to be done. Explain to your family, colleagues and friends what illness you have, and what they should do if necessary.

Show them the animated clip below.

🎬 Video: Taylor Davis Spreads Awareness about Cushing’s Disease

 

FLORENCE, SC (WBTW) – 21-year-old Taylor Davis, spent nearly three years battling a mysterious illness called Cushing’s Disease.

“I could barely walk to class anymore. I was in pain. I gained like 70 pounds, despite extreme dieting and exercising,” said Davis.

When Davis enrolled into her spring semester classes at USC, she started experiencing several symptoms.

“I noticed my grades started to take a fall and I was like ok something is seriously wrong here because I’ve never had trouble in school and I could stay up studying all night long and not remember anything the next day,” said Davis.

Davis went from doctor to doctor, but no one could figure out what was wrong with her.

“I thought I was going crazy. Every doctor would say keep trying to diet and exercise and we’ll get you on some medication for your depression and your anxiety,” said Davis.

After dropping out of USC and spending time in the emergency room, a Cushing’s Disease Facebook group led her to a research doctor in California.

“Around October is when the doctor officially diagnosed me and within a month I had my brain surgery scheduled,” said Davis.

Fast forward a couple months later, Davis is thankful to share her experiences on social media and help others going through the same disease.

“I post about it all the time and by using the hashtags for Cushing’s disease, I probably get three to four messages a day from people all over the world. I’ve had people message me in Spanish and I have to use google translate to try and help them,” said Davis.

From https://www.wbtw.com/news/a-woman-in-the-pee-dee-spreads-awareness-on-mysterious-disease/

🎬 Video: Pituitary tumors: Mayo Clinic Radio

 

This interview originally aired July 6, 2019.  Dr. William Young Jr., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, discussed pituitary gland tumors.

The pituitary gland is a hormone-producing gland at the base of the brain. Sometimes known as the “master gland,” the pituitary gland produces and regulates hormones that help the body function. Pituitary tumors are abnormal growths that develop in your pituitary gland.

Some pituitary tumors result in too many of the hormones that regulate important functions of your body. Some pituitary tumors can cause your pituitary gland to produce lower levels of hormones. Most pituitary tumors are noncancerous (benign) growths that remain in your pituitary gland or surrounding tissues, and don’t spread to other parts of your body. There are various options for treating pituitary tumors, including removing the tumor, controlling its growth and managing your hormone levels with medications. Your health care provider also may recommend a wait-and-see approach.

🎬 Video: Cushing’s Syndrome – Story of a Patient

Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disease which affects 65 patients in one million inhabitants of the EU. Cushing’s syndrome is a state where the body is chronically exposed to a high concentration of cortisol.

The signs of the disease are often overlooked. It took 14 years to diagnose Ida with the disease and to start treating it successfully. On Cushing’s Awareness Day, Ida emphasizes the importance of communication between the patient and the doctor.

🎬 VIDEO: ‘Subclinical’ Cushing’s syndrome needs new name

In this video exclusive, Endocrine Today Editorial Board Member Maria Fleseriu, MD, FACE, professor of neurological surgery and professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and clinical nutrition in the School of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University and director of the OHSU Northwest Pituitary Center, discusses why mild Cushing’s syndrome matters.

In the past mild autonomous Cushing’s has been referred to as “subclinical Cushing’s syndrome.”

“What is subclinical about a patient that has, for example, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis?” Fleseriu said.

She describes how to screen for and treat mild Cushing’s syndrome in patients with adrenal incidentalomas.

Watch the video for more.  If it doesn’t show up, please click here.

From Helio