Cushing’s is RARE”, “No one has Cushing’s!

Myth: “Cushing’s is RARE”, “No one has Cushing’s!”, “It is literally impossible for you to have Cushing’s Disease!”

myth-busted

Fact: We have all been guilty of referring to Cushing’s as a “Rare” disease. I*, myself, say this all the time. In fact, the statistics state that only about 2 in every million people are afflicted with this disease. However, these are documented cases.

In reality, Cushing’s is not as rare as we once thought. The fact is that Cushing’s is just rarely diagnosed! Non experts tend to not test accurately and adequately for Cushing’s.

With an inappropriate protocol for testing, the prevalence of accurate diagnoses decreases. Cushing’s experts DO understand how extensive and difficult the diagnostic process is, so they tend to be more deliberate and thorough when exploring possible Cushing’s in their patients. Cushing’s patients who cycle also have to be more persistent in asking for adequate testing so that they are appropriately diagnosed.

The following video is an accurate portrayal of what many patients experience when trying to get help for their symptoms:

Please review the following links:
http://home.comcast.net/~staticnrg/Cushings/LimitationsSC_UFC_dex_mildCS.pdf
http://survivethejourney.blogspot.com/2008/11/new-research-has-shown-cushings.html

* Dr. Karen Ternier Thames

Interview with Jayne, Ectopic Cushing’s Patient

 

Mary O’Connor (MaryO) hosted an interview with Jayne, a Cushing’s patient who had pituitary surgeries and a bilateral adrenalectomy before finding the true source of her ectopic Cushing’s.

Listen here.

HOME | Sitemap | Adrenal Crisis! | Abbreviations | Glossary | Forums | Donate | Bios | Add Your Bio | Add Your Doctor | MemberMap | CushieWiki

Cushing’s Awareness Challenge – Day 4

From Danielle’s Blog:  http://www.lifewithcushings.com/2017/04/cushings-awareness-challenge-day-4.html

I have often said, I wish I had cancer instead. Most people would not understand this sentiment, why in the world would you wish for such a horrible disease?

It is another common thread tying people with chronic illness together. If my disease was cancer, everyone would know what it was. I wouldn’t be questioned by my boss when I called in sick. My friends and family would be more supportive. My doctors wouldn’t question my symptoms.

Maybe my life would be easier.

Read the rest of the post at http://www.lifewithcushings.com/2017/04/cushings-awareness-challenge-day-4.html

Day 4: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2017

In Day 9 on April 9, 2015, I wrote about how we got the Cushing’s colors of blue and yellow.  This post is going to be about the first Cushing’s ribbons.

 

I was on vacation  in September, 2001 when SuziQ called me to let me know that we had had our first Cushie casualty (that we knew about).

On the message boards, Lorrie wrote: Our dear friend, Janice died this past Tuesday, September 4, 2001. I received an IM from her best friend Janine, tonight. Janine had been reading the boards, as Janice had told her about this site, and she came upon my name and decided to IM me. I am grateful that she did. She said that she knew that Janice would want all of us to know that she didn’t just stop posting.

For all of the newcomers to the board that did not know Janice, she was a very caring individual. She always had something positive to say. Janice was 36 years old, was married and had no children. She had a miscarriage in December and began to have symptoms of Cushing’s during that pregnancy. After the pregnancy, she continued to have symptoms. When discussing this with her doctor, she was told that her symptoms were just related to her D&C. She did not buy this and continued until she received the accurate diagnosis of Cushing’s Syndrome (adrenal) in March of 2001. Tragically, Janice’s tumor was cancerous, a very rare form of Cushing’s.

Janice then had her tumor and adrenal gland removed by open adrenalectomy, a few months ago. She then began chemotherapy. She was very brave through this even though she experienced severe side effects, including weakness and dizziness. She continued to post on this board at times and even though she was going through so much, she continued with a positive attitude. She even gave me a referral to a doctor a few weeks ago. She was my inspiration. Whenever I thought I had it bad, I thought of what she was dealing with, and I gained more perspective.

Janice was having difficulty with low potassium levels and difficulty breathing. She was admitted to the hospital, a CT scan was done and showed tumor metastasis to the lungs. She then was begun on a more aggressive regimen of chemo. She was discharged and apparently seemed to be doing well.

The potassium then began to drop again, she spiked a temp and she was again admitted to the hospital. She improved and was set to be discharged and then she threw a blood clot into her lungs. She was required to be put on a ventilator. She apparently was at high risk for a heart attack. Her husband did not want her to suffer anymore and did not want her to suffer the pain of a heart attack and so chose for the doctors to discontinue the ventilator on Tuesday. She died shortly thereafter.

Janice was our friend. She was a Cushie sister. I will always remember her. Janine asked me to let her know when we get the Cushing’s ribbons made as she and the rest of Janice’s family would like to wear them in her memory. She said that Janice would want to do anything she could to make others more aware of Cushing’s.

The image at the top of the page shows the first blue and yellow ribbon which were worn at Janice’s funeral.  When we had our “official ribbons” made, we sent several to Janice’s family.

Janice was the first of us to die but there have been more, way too many more, over the years.  I’ll write a bit more about that on Day 21.