Dr. Oyesiku to Receive Distinguished Service Award from Society of University Neurosurgeons

The award will presented to Dr. Oyesiku at the Society’s 2021 Annual Meeting August 8-11.


Nelson M. Oyesiku, MD, PhD, FACS, Chair Chair of the UNC School of Medicine Department of Neurosurgery, will receive the Distinguished Service Award given by the Society of University Neurosurgeons at their 2021 Annual Meeting in Whitefish, Montana, August 8-11.

Prior to joining the UNC faculty on April 1, 2021, Dr. Oyesiku was Professor of Neurological Surgery and Medicine (Endocrinology) at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia and the Inaugural Daniel Louis Barrow Chair in Neurosurgery, Vice-Chairman of the Department of Neurological Surgery and Director of the Neurosurgical Residency Program. Dr. Oyesiku’s clinical expertise is pituitary medicine and surgery. Dr. Oyesiku was co-director of the Emory Pituitary Center and has developed one of the largest practices entirely devoted to the care of patients with pituitary tumors in the country and has performed over 3,700 pituitary tumor operations. Dr. Oyesiku obtained his MD from the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He obtained an MSc in Occupational Medicine from the University of London, UK and completed a PhD in Neuroscience at Emory University. He completed his Surgery Internship at the University of Connecticut-Hartford Hospital and obtained his neurosurgical training at Emory University, Atlanta. He is board-certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery. He received an NIH K08 Award and Faculty Development Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation was a recipient of an NIH R01 award and PI of the NIH/NINDS R25 Research Education Program for Residents and Fellows in Neurosurgery. Dr. Oyesiku has served on several NIH Study Sections. Dr. Oyesiku’s research is focused on the molecular pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, and tumor receptor imaging and targeting for therapy.

Dr. Oyesiku has served on various state, regional, national and international committees for all the major neurosurgical organizations. He has served on the Board of Directors and as Chairman of the American Board of Neurological Surgery. He was on the ACGME-Residency Review Committee of Neurosurgery. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and has served on its Board of Governors. Dr. Oyesiku has been President of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. He has served as Secretary/Treasurer and President of the Georgia Neurosurgical Society, President of the Society of University Neurosurgeons, and Vice-President of the American Academy of Neurological Surgeons. He is President of the International Society of Pituitary Surgeons. He is President-Elect of the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons.

Dr. Oyesiku is Editor-in-Chief of NEUROSURGERY, OPERATIVE NEUROSURGERY and NEUROSURGERY OPEN – leading journals in neurosurgery. He is author of over 180 scientific articles and book chapters.

He has been selected by his peers as one of The Best Doctors in America and was selected by the Consumer Research Council of America as one of America’s Top Surgeons. He is named in Marquis Who’s Who in America. He is a member of the Honor Medical Society – Alpha Omega Alpha. He was awarded the “Gentle Giant Award” by the Pituitary Network Association for his services to Pituitary Surgery and Medicine. He is on the Medical Advisory Board of the Cushing’s Support and Research Foundation. He has been visiting professor and invited faculty at several departments of neurosurgery in the United States and abroad.

From https://news.unchealthcare.org/2021/08/oyesiku-to-receive-distinguished-service-award-from-society-of-university-neurosurgeons/

From Dr. Friedman: COVID-19: 07/2021 UPDATE AND FACTS

All of our country is very encouraged by the declining rates in both COVID-19 infections and death, due mostly to President Trump’s vaccine production and trial effort called Operation Warp Speed and President Biden’s vaccine distribution efforts. As of July 2021, The United States has administered 334,600,770 doses of COVID-19 vaccines, 184,132,768 people had received at least one dose while 159,266,536 people are fully vaccinated. The pandemic is by no means over, as people are still getting infected with COVID-19 with the emergence of the Delta Variant. In fact, recently cases, hospitalizations and deaths due to COVID-19 have gone up. In Los Angeles, the increased infection rate has led to indoor mask requirements.  The main reason that COVID-19 has not been eliminated is because of vaccine hesitancy, which is often due to misinformation propagated on websites and social media.  One of Dr. Friedman’s patients gave him a link of an alternative doctor who gave multiple episodes of misinformation subtitled “Evidence suggests people who have received the COVID “vaccine” may have a reduced lifespan” about the COVID-19 vaccine that Dr. Friedman wants to address. Almost 30% of American say they will not get the vaccine, up from 20% a few months ago. 
 
Statistics are that people who are vaccinated have a 1:1,000,000 chance of dying from COVID, while people who are unvaccinated have a 1:500 chance of dying from COVID.  I think most people would take the 1:1,000,000 risk.  Dr. Friedman has always been a proponent of the COVID-19 vaccine because he is a scientist and bases his decisions on peer-reviewed literature and not social media posts. As we are getting to the stage where the COVID-19 pandemic could end if vaccination rates increase, he feels that it is even more important for people to get correct information about the COVID-19 vaccine. 
 
MYTH:  People are dying at high rates from the COVID-19 vaccine and the rates of complications and deaths are underreported.
FACT:  The rates of complications and deaths from the vaccine are overreported.  It is a fact that when 200 million people get a vaccine, some of them will get blood clots, some of them will have a heart attack, some of them will have strokes, some of them will have optic neuritis and some will have Guillain-Barré syndrome.  These complications may not be due to the vaccine, but people remember that they got the vaccine recently.  Anti-vaccine websites seem to play up on this and give false information that COVID-19 complications are underreported and fail to note that there is no control group, so we do not know how many people would have gotten blood clots, strokes, and heart attacks if they did not get the vaccine.  For example, one anti-vaccine website highlighted a Tamil (Indian) actor Vivek, who died of a massive heart attack 5 days after getting the COVID-19 vaccine and tried to make a case that the vaccine caused that.  Of course, the massive heart attack was due to years of buildup of cholesterol in his coronary arteries and had nothing to do with the COVID-19 vaccine.  In fact, the complications attributed to the COVID-19 vaccine occur less frequently in those vaccinated than unvaccinated. The only complication that seems to possibly be more common in people who get vaccinated is blood clots, and the rate of that is still quite low.  Overwhelmingly, the COVID-19 vaccine is effective and safe.
 
MYTH:  I had COVID-19 before.  I don’t need a vaccine.  Natural immunity is better than a vaccine immunity.
FACT:  Most studies have shown that the COVID-19 vaccines are more effective, with longer-lasting immunity, than only having the COVID-19 infection.  The immunity after natural infection varies and may be quite minimal in patients who had mild COVID-19 and likely declines within a couple of months of infection.  In contrast, those who got the vaccine seem to have high levels of immunity even months after getting the vaccine.  The vaccine also protects against the COVID-19 variants.  If someone had one variant, it is unlikely that their natural immunity would protect them against other variants.
 
MYTH:  The COVID-19 vaccine leads to spike proteins circulating in your body for months after the vaccine.
FACT:  The mRNA from the vaccine, the spike protein that it generates, and all of the products of the COVID-19 vaccine are gone within hours, if not days, and do not hang around the body.
 
MYTH:  There is likely to be long-term effects, including infertility effects, of the COVID-19 vaccine.
FACT:  As the viral particles and proteins are gone within a couple hours to days and the vaccine only enters the cytoplasm and does not enter the DNA, it is very unlikely that there will be long-term effects.  So far, the clinical trials of the COVID-19 vaccine have not resulted in any detrimental effects, and it has been a year since the trials started.  Other vaccines have been used safely and do not give long-term side effects.  There is no reason to think that this vaccine would give long-term side effects, and we have not seen any evidence of long-term side effects currently. Pregnant women who received COVID-19 vaccines have similar rates adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes (e.g., fetal loss, preterm birth, small size for gestational age, congenital anomalies, and neonatal death) as with pregnant women who did not receive vaccines.
 
MYTH:  People with autoimmune disease should not get the vaccine.
FACT:  Persons with autoimmune disease are likely more susceptible to COVID-19, and they should especially get the vaccine.  People with preexisting conditions, including autoimmune diseases, have been shown to be give generally excellent immune responses to the vaccine, and it should especially be given to patients with Addison’s disease or Cushing’s disease who may have higher rates of getting more severe COVID-19. In fact, the CDC as well Dr. Friedman recommends EVERYONE getting the vaccine, except 1) those under 12, 2) those who had an anaphylactic reaction to their first COVID-19 vaccine. Patients with AIDS, and those on immunosuppressive therapy for cancers, organ transplants and rheumatological conditions, may not be fully protected from vaccines and should be cautious (including wearing masks and social distancing), but still should get vaccinated.
 
MYTH:  Patients with autoimmune diseases, and other conditions do not mount an adequate immune response to the vaccine and may even should get a booster shot.
FACT:  The only patients that have been found not to have a good immune response to the vaccine is those with AIDS or on immunosuppressive drugs that are used in people with rheumatological diseases or transplants.  With these exception, patients appear to mount a good immune response to the vaccine regardless of their preexisting condition and do not need a booster shot.
 
MYTH:  Why should I bother with the vaccine if it is going to require a booster shot?
FACT:  It is unclear whether booster shots will be required or not.  Currently, the CDC and FDA do not recommend a booster shot, but Pfizer has petitioned the FDA to consider it and is starting more studies on whether a booster shot is effective.  It is currently believed that the vaccine retains effectiveness for months to years after it is given.
 
MYTH:  We are almost at herd immunity now.  Why bother getting a vaccine?
FACT:  We are not at herd immunity as people are still getting sick and dying from COVID-19.  Dr. Friedman recently lost to COVID-19 his 43-year old patient with obesity and diabetes at MLK Outpatient Center. There are pockets in the United States with low vaccine rates, especially in the South.  The vaccine is spreading among unvaccinated people, while the rate of spread among vaccinated people is quite low.  Approximately 98% of those hospitalized with COVID-19 are unvaccinated. It is important from a public health viewpoint for all Americans to get vaccinated. 
 
MYTH:  There is nothing to be concerned with about the variants.
FACT:  Especially the delta variant appears to be more contagious and aggressive than the other variants currently.  The vaccines do appear to be effective against the delta variant but possibly a little less so.  Variants multiply and can generate new variants only if they are infected into patients who are unvaccinated.  To end the emergence of new variants, it is important for all Americans to get vaccinated.
 
MYTH:  I could just be careful, and I will not get the COVID-19 vaccine.
FACT:  Thousands of people who were careful and got COVID-19 and either died from it or became extremely sick.  The best prevention against getting COVID-19 is to get vaccinated.
 
MYTH:  I am young.  I do not have to worry about getting COVID.
FACT:  Many young people have gotten sick and died of COVID-19 and also, they are contagious and can spread COVID-19 if they are not vaccinated.  Everyone, regardless of their age, as long as they are over 12, should get vaccinated. 
 
MYTH:  If children under 12 are not vaccinated, the virus will still spread.
FACT:  The FDA and CDC do not recommend the vaccine for those under 12.  They are very unlikely to get COVID-19 and are very unlikely to transmit it to others.  They are the one group that does not need to get vaccinated.
 
MYTH:  COVID-19 vaccines are an experimental vaccine.
FACT:  While it is true that the FDA approved COVID-19 vaccines were granted emergency use authorization in December 2020 (Pfizer and Moderna) and Johnson and Johnson in February 2021. Both Pfizer and Moderna have petitioned the FDA for full approval, but by no means are these vaccines experimental. As mentioned, over 180 million Americans and many more worldwide have received the vaccine. This is more than any other FDA approved medication. Clinical trials are still ongoing and have enrolled thousands of people and Israel has monitored the effect of COVID-19 vaccines in 7 million Israelis. 
 
MYTH:  The COVID-19 vaccine is a government plot to kill or injure people or a war against G-d.
FACT:  Yeah right
 
If you want the pandemic to end, please get vaccinated and encourage your friends and colleagues to get vaccinated. For more information or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Friedman, go to goodhormonehealth.com

❣️ Happy 21st Birthday Cushing’s Help!

It’s unbelievable but the idea for Cushing’s Help and Support arrived 21 years ago late last night. I was talking with my dear friend Alice, who ran a wonderful menopause site called Power Surge, wondering why there weren’t many support groups online (OR off!) for Cushing’s and I wondered if I could start one myself and we decided that I could.

Thanks to a now-defunct Microsoft program called FrontPage, the first one-page “website” (http://www.cushings-help.com) first went “live” July 21, 2000 and the message boards September 30, 2000.

All our Cushing’s-related sites:

Living Rare Living Stronger ~ Nord® Patient and Family Forum June 26-27Th

2021 Living Rare, Living Stronger NORD Patient and Family Forum featuring the Rare Impact Awards

Those who wish to gain practical tools for living optimally with rare diseases are encouraged to attend the annual Living Rare Living Stronger Patient and Family Forum, hosted by the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) and set this year for June 26-27.

The conference brings together patients, families, healthcare professionals, and other supporters for learning, sharing, and connecting.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the general sessions, breakout workshops, and networking will again be virtual. The sessions, which will offer perspectives from patients, caregivers, and the medical community, will air live and be recorded for later viewing. Throughout the forum, participants will be able to visit the exhibit hall and have peer meetings with other attendees.

Also this year, the Rare Impact Awards will return as part of the program. That presentation, on June 28, honors individuals, organizations, and industry innovators for exceptional work benefitting the rare disease community.

“The health and well-being of people living with rare diseases, their loved ones and those working to improve their lives continues to remain a top priority for all of us here at NORD,” the organization stated in its forum announcement.

“The COVID-19 pandemic brought us new ways to engage with our community and our 2020 virtual program was the most successful forum to date! In 2021 we will continue to work hard to keep our community healthy and safe while engaging in this impactful program,” NORD said.

Registration for the “patient-centric” event is $39 for patients, caregivers, students, and NORD patient organization representatives. The cost is $75 for professional advocates, people from academia, physicians, and government representatives, and $500 for NORD corporate council members. For pharmaceutical, insurance, or other representatives, registration is $650.

As for the agenda, the opening discussion will be on “The Patient-Professional Partnership” and will include three stories on the close bond between patients and their care professionals.

Breakout sessions for Saturday, June 26 will include “Coping with Grief and Anticipatory Grief,” “Shared Decision-Making with Your Care Team,” and “Working While Rare” as first offerings, followed by “Getting Involved in Clinical Research: Finding and Preparing for Clinical Trials,” “Navigating Insurance, Social Security Disability and Patient Assistance Programs,” and “The ABCs of Advocating for Your Child’s Education” in the second group of workshops.

Those will be followed by a plenary discussion on the topic “Building Resilience in a Time of Unknowns.” The speakers will explore how patients coped while waiting for a diagnosis, how they are faring while waiting for new treatments, and how they have kept it together during the pandemic.

June 27 will start with an opening plenary discussion titled “The Rare Sibling Experience.” Here, three siblings of rare disease patients will share their experiences, including how they became advocates.

Breakout sessions on this day will include “Fighting Back and Fighting Forward Through Advocacy,” “Palliative Care: Debunking the Myths,” “Rare in the Family: Navigating the Roles of Patient, Parent, and Caregiver” in the first set of discussion groups. Later offerings that Sunday will include “Aging with a Rare Condition,” “Finding Your Community and Building Your Support Network,” and “The Intersection of Race, Ethnicity, and Equity with Diagnosis and Treatment Access.”

The closing plenary discussion, titled “Rare Breakthroughs Now and on the Horizon,” will cover the latest advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of rare diseases.

Early this year, NORD put out a call out for individuals who were willing to share their real-life experiences with rare diseases at the conference. In all, including physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals, the conference will feature some 55 speakers. Access to the virtual program will be provided via email the week of the event.

Can You Help?

I think I have Cushing’s I have about 10 symptoms…my cortisol levels came out high with a 24 hour urine hormone panel but my endocrinologist did not even mention it. At the time when I had the test done, (March 2020)I had no idea what cortisol was. I just figured and trusted my endocrinologist would prescribe me with whatever hormones and or treatment I needed and would have me take whatever tests he order. Anyhow, in a range from 1-10 for bedtime cortisol, my result was 27! Cortisol metabolites, range from 1160-2183, my result was 5370!!!

The only reason I started to do more research on cortisol is because just a few weeks ago I started experiencing severe chest pain from the moment I wake up and any little thing stresses me out and gives me anxiety and I feel like I’m gonna have a heart attack any moment!  So I looked back at my paperwork and noticed these really elevated cortisol levels. But my endocrinologist never mention them… Why? This is how I found this disease,  I have so many symptoms of Cushing’s disease, And it is not a result of exogenous stuff causing cortisol levels to rise. I don’t take any medication whatsoever and was not taking any medication at that time or for the past year. All I have taken for the past year is what he prescribed, thyroid medication and progesterone. Someone please tell me if these levels are of concern from your perspective.

Please respond here or on the message boards.

Thanks!

💉 In Manchester? New Endocrinology Unit

Stockport, NHS FT, has opened a new specialist endocrinology investigation unit, making it one of only two clinics of its type in Greater Manchester. One of the main benefits is, it will ensure patients with potential endocrinology conditions are treated faster, with more accurate assessments carried out. The specialist unit will also allow patients to receive their diagnosis as outpatients, without the need for an inpatient stay.

Endocrinology is the study and management of hormone related disorders which are often complex, and include some rare conditions. If hormones become unbalanced, they can lead to various conditions known as endocrine disorders. These are the conditions which are diagnosed and treated by the clinic’s consultants. Some of the examples include thyroid problems, adrenal nodules, which may lead to Cushing’s syndrome with hypertension, diabetes and osteoporosis; or pituitary nodules, which may lead to pituitary deficiency or cause blindness.

Some of these conditions are difficult to diagnose, and simple blood tests are not enough. In these cases, ‘dynamic tests’ are needed, which require significant expertise in how they are performed and how the results are interpreted. Previously these specialised tests required an inpatient stay, where patients would often have to wait for over few months.

Dr Daniela Aflorei, Consultant in Diabetes and Endocrinology for Stockport FT, who runs the clinic, said “I am delighted we are now able to provide a specialist Endocrinology service at our hospital which can provide quicker and more convenient care for our patients.

“With these conditions, swift diagnosis is very important for effective treatment, so this is going to have real benefit for people’s lives. I’d like to thank the many members of staff who helped us set up the new clinic and made it possible.”

The clinic has reduced the typical waiting time significantly, due to the clinic being run by endocrinology specialists. Patients have the opportunity to meet the endocrinology specialist nurses, helping understand the reasons for the tests to be discussed, keeping them informed in all aspects of their treatment.

The specialist clinic is run on one day each week, and is expected to benefit around 300 patients a year.

From https://www.nationalhealthexecutive.com/articles/specialist-unit-improve-endocrinology-care

🖥 SherryC Cushing’s Slideshow

Cushing’s Help message board member sherryc presented this PowerPoint at Pioneer Pacific College in 2017.  I am resharing since Sherry died last year.

She says that it took a lot of work with her failing memory but she did It! She wanted to get the word out about Cushing’s and her journey with this awful disease.

🎥 Pituitary Tumors and Treatments

Pituitary tumors start in the pituitary gland. They’re usually benign (not cancerous) and rarely spread to other parts of the body.

Dr. Borghei-Razavi discusses pituitary tumors and treatments through minimally invasive surgical approaches offered at Cleveland Clinic Florida.

🦓 Day 30, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2021

Today is the final day of the Cushing’s Awareness Challenge and I wanted to leave you with this word of advice…

To that end, I’m saving some of what I know for future blog posts, maybe even another Cushing’s Awareness Challenge next year.  Possibly this has become a tradition.

I am amazed at how well this Challenge went this year, giving that we’re all Cushies who are dealing with so much.   I hope that some folks outside the Cushing’s community read these posts and learned a little more about us and what we go through.

So, tomorrow, I’ll go back to posting the regular Cushing’s stuff on this blog – after all, it does have Cushing’s in its name!

I am trying to get away from always reading, writing, breathing Cushing’s, and trying to celebrate the good things in my life, not just the testing, the surgery, the endless doctors.

If you’re interested, I have other blogs about traveling, friends, fun stuff and trying to live a good life, finally.  Those are listed in the right sidebar of this blog, past the Categories and before the Tags.

Meanwhile…

Time-for-me

Choose wisely…