👥 Stanford Pituitary Patient Education Day

The Stanford Pituitary Center invites patients with pituitary disease, their family and friends to Stanford’s Pituitary Patient Education Day!

May 18, 2019 at the Sheraton Palo Alto Hotel
625 El Camino Real
Palo Alto, CA 94301 
USA

Registration Contact:

Jennie Visitacion
E: JennieV@Stanford.edu
Ph: 650-725-4715

Topics and Breakout Sessions:

  • Function of the pituitary gland
  • General review of pituitary tumors
  • Endoscopic endonasal surgery for pituitary tumors
  • Quality of life after endonasal surgery
  • Radiation therapy for pituitary tumors
  • Cushing’s Disease, prolactinoma, and acromegaly
  • Hypopituitarism therapy and growth hormone deficiency

Speakers:

  • Olivia Chu, NP, Nurse Practitioner
  • Robert Dodd, MD, Associate Professor of Neurosurgery
  • Juan Fernandez-Miranda, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery
  • Andrew Hoffman, MD, Professor of Medicine
  • Peter Hwang, MD, Professor of Otolaryngology
  • Laurence Katznelson, MD, Professor of Neurosurgery and Medicine
  • Erin Wolff, NP, Nurse Practitioner

Course Directors:

Dr. Juan C. Fernandez Miranda

Juan C. Fernandez-Miranda, MD, FACS
Professor of Neurosurgery, and by Courtesy, of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery
Co-Director, Stanford Skull Base Surgery Program

Dr. Laurence Katznelson

Laurence Katznelson, MD
Professor of Neurosurgery and of Medicine (Endocrinology)
Medical Director, Pituitary Center

✏️ It’s Time to Sign Up for the Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2019

I plan to do the Cushing’s Awareness Challenge again. Last year’s info is here:  https://cushieblogger.com/2018/03/11/time-to-sign-up-for-the-cushings-awareness-challenge-2018/

The original page is getting very slow loading, so I’ve moved my own posts to this newer blog.

As always, anyone who wants to join me can share their blog URL with me and I’ll add it to the links on the right side, so whenever a new post comes up, it will show up automatically.

If the blogs are on WordPress, I try to reblog them all to get even more exposure on the blog, on Twitter and on Facebook at Cushings Help Organization, Inc.  If you have photos, and you give me permission, I’ll add them to the Pinterest page for Cushing’s Help.


The Cushing’s Awareness Challenge is almost upon us again!
Do you blog? Want to get started?
Since April 8 is Cushing’s Awareness Day, several people got their heads together to create the Eighth Annual Cushing’s Awareness Blogging Challenge.
All you have to do is blog about something Cushing’s related for the 30 days of April.
There will also be a logo for your blog to show you’ve participated.
Please let me know the URL to your blog in the comments area of this post, on the Facebook page, in one of the Cushing’s Help Facebook Groups, on the message boards or an email  and I will list it on CushieBloggers (  http://cushie-blogger.blogspot.com/ )
The more people who participate, the more the word will get out about Cushing’s.
Suggested topics – or add your own!
  • In what ways have Cushing’s made you a better person?
  • What have you learned about the medical community since you have become sick?
  • If you had one chance to speak to an endocrinologist association meeting, what would you tell them about Cushing’s patients?
  • What would you tell the friends and family of another Cushing’s patient in order to garner more emotional support for your friend? challenge with Cushing’s? How have you overcome challenges? Stuff like that.
  • I have Cushing’s Disease….(personal synopsis)
  • How I found out I have Cushing’s
  • What is Cushing’s Disease/Syndrome? (Personal variation, i.e. adrenal or pituitary or ectopic, etc.)
  • My challenges with Cushing’s
  • Overcoming challenges with Cushing’s (could include any challenges)
  • If I could speak to an endocrinologist organization, I would tell them….
  • What would I tell others trying to be diagnosed?
  • What would I tell families of those who are sick with Cushing’s?
  • Treatments I’ve gone through to try to be cured/treatments I may have to go through to be cured.
  • What will happen if I’m not cured?
  • I write about my health because…
  • 10 Things I Couldn’t Live Without.
  • My Dream Day.
  • What I learned the hard way
  • Miracle Cure. (Write a news-style article on a miracle cure. What’s the cure? How do you get the cure? Be sure to include a disclaimer)
  • Give yourself, your condition, or your health focus a mascot. Is it a real person? Fictional? Mythical being? Describe them. Bonus points if you provide a visual!
  • 5 Challenges & 5 Small Victories.
  • The First Time I…
  • Make a word cloud or tree with a list of words that come to mind when you think about your blog, health, or interests. Use a thesaurus to make it branch more.
  • How much money have you spent on Cushing’s, or, How did Cushing’s impact your life financially?
  • Why do you think Cushing’s may not be as rare as doctors believe?
  • What is your theory about what causes Cushing’s?
  • How has Cushing’s altered the trajectory of your life? What would you have done? Who would you have been
  • What three things has Cushing’s stolen from you? What do you miss the most? What can you do in your Cushing’s life to still achieve any of those goals?
  • What new goals did Cushing’s bring to you?
  • How do you cope?
  • What do you do to improve your quality of life as you fight Cushing’s?
  • How Cushing’s affects children and their families
  • Your thoughts…?
maryo colorful zebra

💉 Dr. Ali Krisht receives 2019 Herbert Olivecrona Award

A possible Helpful Doctor.  Anyone have any feedback?

 

Little Rock-based Arkansas Neuroscience Institute Co-founder and Director Ali Krisht, MD, received the 2019 Herbert Olivecrona Award for his neurosurgery work, Arkansas Money & Politics reports.

What you should know:

1. Dr. Krisht earned the honor — sometimes known as the Nobel Prize for neurosurgery — for his cerebrovascular, pituitary and skull base tumor surgery work.

2. He will receive the honor at the Scandinavian Neurosurgical Society meeting, May 19-20 in Stockholm, Sweden, where he will also deliver the conference’s Olivecrona lecture.

3. Dr. Krisht is a renowned neurosurgeon. He earned his medical degree from Beirut, Lebanon-based American University of Beirut and completed a residency at Atlanta-based Emory University.

4. He is Contemporary Neurosurgery’s chief editor and served as Pituitary Disorders: Comprehensive Management’s main editor.

5. Dr. Krisht has written 20 book chapters and 50 peer-reviewed manuscripts. He has delivered more than 170 lectures and has directed more than 40 workshops and hands-on courses.