❓Do You Use Mario Badescu Skin Care Products?

Thirty-one former customers have filed suit in New Jersey State Court against Mario Badescu, Inc., a skincare company based out of Edison, New Jersey, and Mario Badescu Skin Care, Inc., a skincare salon in New York.

The plaintiffs allege that they were injured by potent and undisclosed steroids in two of Mario Badescu’s face creams, Control Cream, and Healing Cream, which were marketed as products that contained only “botanical” active ingredients that were safe for daily use. The complaint alleges that contrary to what Mario Badescu told the public, Control Cream and Healing Cream contained two steroids: hydrocortisone and triamcinolone acetonide. The complaint also alleges that Mario Badescu’s products contained higher than prescription-strength doses of triamcinolone acetonide. Both steroids pose serious health risks to both the skin and the body’s adrenal system.

The plaintiffs were unaware of the steroids in Mario Badescu’s products and used the products on their faces, usually daily, for as long as fourteen years. Many of the plaintiffs allege that they unwittingly became addicted to the steroids such that even a day without use of the Products caused severe and painful withdrawal reactions. Moreover, many of the plaintiffs allege that they suffered from steroid-related ailments while using Control Cream or Healing Cream, including cataracts, glaucoma, mood disorders, heart issues, elevated cortisol levels, adrenal system suppression and Cushing’s Syndrome. Plaintiffs allege that because they did not know they were using steroids at the time, they were unable to inform their physicians about the true source of their injuries and were repeatedly misdiagnosed by their medical providers.

“Mario Badescu secretly added an addictive prescription steroid to its cosmetic face creams, then told its customers that the creams were safe for daily use,” Plaintiffs’ counsel, Gary E. Mason said. “Our clients suffered devastating injuries as a result of this deception,” Mason added.

The plaintiffs are represented by John C. Whitfield, Gary E. Mason, Esfand Nafisi, and Caroline Ramsey Taylor of Whitfield Bryson & Mason LLP, and Michael Galpern, Andrew Bell and Janet Walsh of Locks Law Firm, LLC. For more information about the lawsuit, contact the firm by phone at (202)640-1167.

The name of the case is Restaino et al. v. Mario Badescu, Inc. et al., No. MID-L-5830-14 (N.J. Super. Ct. Law Div., filed Sept. 25, 2014).

See us on WTVH/WEHT Evansville! “Tristate Law Firm Takes On Major Cosmetics Company

🎬 Video: Cushing Disease & ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Tumors

Irina Bancos, M.D., an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and Jamie J. Van Gompel, M.D., a neurosurgeon at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Minnesota, discuss Mayo’s multidisciplinary approach to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary tumors. Pituitary tumors are common and often don’t cause problems. But some pituitary tumors produce the hormone ACTH, which stimulates the production of another hormone (cortisol). Overproduction of cortisol can result in Cushing syndrome, with signs and symptoms such as weight gain, skin changes and fatigue. Cushing syndrome is rare but can cause significant long-term health problems.

Treatment for Cushing syndrome caused by a pituitary tumor generally involves surgery to remove the tumor. Radiation therapy and occasionally adrenal surgery may be needed to treat Cushing syndrome caused by ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors. Mayo Clinic has experience with this rare condition.

📞 Webinar: Does Extent of Resection Matter in Pituitary Surgery?

 

Presented By

Jamie J. Van Gompel, MD, FAANS
Associate Professor in Neurosurgery and Otorhinolaryngology
Program Director, Vice Chair of Education, Department of Neurologic Surgery
Associate Program Director, Neurosurgical Skull Base Oncology Fellowship
Program Director, International Neurosurgery Fellowship
Mayo Clinic – Rochester, MN

and

Garret W. Choby, MD
Rhinologist
Endoscopic Skull Base Surgeon
Mayo Clinic – Rochester, MN

Register here

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

If you have any questions or suggestions please feel free to contact webinar@pituitary.org

DATE: Wednesday, March 13, 2019
TIME: 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM Central Daylight Time, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM EDT

Webinar Description

Does Extent of Resection Matter in Pituitary Surgery and Postoperative Nasal Care

Presenter Bios

Jamie J. Van Gompel MD(Honors), BS(Honors) is an Associate professor in neurosurgery and Otolaryngology specializing in endoscopic/open skull base at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, USA. He completed his undergraduate and medical school training at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He has worked at the NIH as well as completed a Howard Hughes Fellowship studying neuroendocrine tumors. His neurosurgical training was undertaken at the Mayo Clinic and he went on to complete a complex cranial fellowship under the tutelage of Dr. Harry van Loveren at the University of South Florida. Currently, He is the Education Vice Chair, Program Director of the Neurosurgery Program and Associate Program Director of the Skull Base Oncology program. Further manages a busy skull base oncology and pituitary practice in addition to performing research with Active NIH U and R funding. He has authored over 150 publications of which over 30 are pertinent to pituitary pathologies and endoscopic surgery.

Garret W. Choby, M.D., is a fellowship-trained rhinologist and endoscopic skull base surgeon practicing at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. He completed his residency training at the University of Pittsburgh and his fellowship training at Stanford University. Dr. Choby works closely with his neurosurgical partners to treat a variety of pituitary and cranial base tumors. His primary research interests include improving oncologic and quality of life outcomes for patients undergoing endonasal tumor resection and tailoring individualized treatment for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.