📞 Pituitary Support Meeting Saturday November 14, 2020

From group leader Sharmyn McGraw: Hi All, I hope you can join us on Zoom this Saturday, Nov. 14, 2020 starting at 9:00 a.m. (PST). For those that can’t make it, I will record the meeting and post it later on our Facebook page. I look forward to seeing you!

📰 WP Thyroid and Nature-Throid recall-August 2020

Dr. Friedman prescribes various thyroid hormone preparations to his patients with hypothyroidism. This includes natural desiccated thyroid (NDT) of which two preparations are WP Thyroid and Nature-Throid, both made by RLC Labs. On August 25, 2020, RLC Labs announced a voluntary, consumer-level recall of all lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets because somel ots contain less than the required 90% of the active ingredient as determined by the FDA. The RLC spokesperson said to Dr. Friedman that one lot of WP Thyroid and 5 lots of Nature-Throid contained between 87% and 90% of the labeled amount of levothyroxine (T4) or liothyronine (T3). The recall did not disclose which of the lots were affected and all lots are recalled, not just the affected lots. According to the recall, if a patient receives a sub-potent tablet, hypothyroid symptoms may not be controlled. To date, there have been no reports of adverse events related to this recall. Patients who have had an adverse event should contact RLC Labs.

RLC Labs advised that patients should talk to their healthcare professional before they stop taking their Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid medicine. Consumers with questions about the recall can email RLC at recall@rlclabs.com or RLC Customer Service  (877) 797-7997. Patients may return unexpired Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets to their pharmacy who are legally required to refund the cost of the tablets. Currently no lots of Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid tablets are commercially available, so a replacement with the same product is not an option. It is unknown how long it will be before Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid become commercially available.

Dr. Friedman has several comments about this recall. This is the second recall of desiccated thyroid as some lots of NP thyroid were recalled in May 2020. Dr. Friedman sees this as unfortunate, but still believes desiccated thyroid is a good option for patients with hypothyroidism. Secondly, the “subpotent” Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid pills are only slightly less potent than stated in that only a few lots are between 87% and 90% of the T4 and T3 levels. For most patients, they will not have symptoms from these subpotent pills and if they are taking a lot that is subpotent, the dose can be adjusted based on laboratory levels at your next appointment with Dr. Friedman.

According to Dr. Friedman, patients taking Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid have three options: 1) they can continue taking Nature-Throid and WP Thyroid knowing they may have a subpotent lot and knowing that they may not be able to get a refill at least temporarily. 2) patients can be switched to Armour thyroid, NP thyroid or have a compounding pharmacy compound the equivalent dose using USP grade porcine powder. Please let Dr. Friedman’s office know if you would like to go on a different desiccated thyroid product (and which one) and what pharmacy you would like to use, 3) Dr. Friedman has a small supply of desiccated thyroid that is available at his clinic for those in Los Angeles on the last Tuesday night of each month. He will not be able to mail desiccated thyroid. Please contact his office about this option.

Patients do not need to contact Dr. Friedman, but if you have any questions or need to schedule an appointment with Dr. Friedman, please email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com or schedule an appointment on his website at goodhormonehealth.com.

📞 Webinar: Growth Hormone Deficiency, PCOS or Cushing’s: How do You Tell Them Apart?

Dr. Theodore Friedman (The Wiz) will host a webinar on Growth Hormone Deficiency, PCOS or Cushing’s: How do You Tell Them Apart?

Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including:

  • Signs and Symptoms of Cushing’s Syndrome
  • Testing for Cushing’s
  • Signs and Symptoms of Growth Hormone Deficiency
  • Testing for Growth Hormone Deficiency
  • Signs and Symptoms of PCOS
  • Testing for PCOS
  • How do you tell them apart?

Sunday • August 2 • 6 PM PDT
Click here on start your meeting or
https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=m4eda0c468071bd2daf33e6189aca3489
OR
Join by phone: (855) 797-9485

Meeting Number (Access Code): 133 727 0164 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry.
Slides will be available on the day of the talk here
There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: pcos
For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com

📞 Webinar: What every Patient needs to know about Recent Advancements in Pituitary Surgery

Presented by Georgios A. Zenonos, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery
Associate Director, Center for Skull Base Surgery
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

200 Lothrop Street, Pittsburgh PA, 15217
Presbyterian Hospital, Suite B400

Register Now!

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Time: 3:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time, 6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time

💉 Helpful Doctors: North Carolina

 

Sherry A added her helpful doctor, Matthew Gorris.

How would you rate your Helpful Doctor? 5/5
Your Doctor’s Name Dr. Matthew Gorris
Your Doctor’s Address Medical Center Boulevard
City: Winston Salem
State / Province: NC
Postal / Zip Code: 27157
Your Doctor’s Phone Number (336) 713-7251
What are your Doctor’s Specialties? Endocrinologist
Hospital Affiliation Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Comments Excellent Doctor, Takes his time, actively listens to his patients concerns and addresses questions in an easy to understand manner.

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❓Can You Help? Very Few Symptoms

A guest on the Cushing’s Help message boards asked:

I’ve been searching every possible alternative explanation. I really hoped I just had a Lipoma but GP was pretty confident no.

I’ve gained about 40lbs in the past year, I bruise easily and I have a Buffalo Hump. Cycle is regular, my mood is good, well ya know pandemic, home schooling, owning a business … Lol I don’t think I’m suffering any unusual stress or anxiety though. I am anxious over the time it’s taking to get any info.

I had blood drawn and an upcoming sono, date TBD, but don’t see my GP for 5 wks!

Can I get blood results over ph and skip right to Endocrinologist if Cortisol is high? Any input of speeding this along?

Anyone else with only a few symptoms?

Thanks!

 

Can you help Ellie out?  Please respond here or on the Message boards.

Thanks!

💉 Helpful Doctors: Washington, D.C.

Someone on Facebook her helpful doctor, Dr. Susmeeta Tewari Sharma.

 

 

How would you rate your Helpful Doctor? 5/5
Your Doctor’s Name Dr. Susmeeta Tewari Sharma
Your Doctor’s Address
110 Irving Street Northwest
GROUND FL.
Suite NW

Washington, DC 20010

Your Doctor’s Phone Number 301-774-8962
What are your Doctor’s Specialties? Many, including Addison’s and Cushing’s.  See this list.

HOME | Sitemap | Abbreviations | Adrenal Crisis! | Glossary | Forums | Bios | Add Your Bio | Add Your Doctor | MemberMap | CushieWiki

📞 Dr. Theodore Friedman (The Wiz) will host a webinar on “How to improve quality of life for those with no adrenals (BLA and Addison’s)”

 

Dr. Friedman will discuss topics including:

  1. Who should get an adrenalectomy?
  2. How do you optimally replace adrenal hormones?
  3. What laboratory tests are needed to monitor replacement?
  4. When and how do you stress dose?
  5. What about subcut cortisol versus cortisol pumps?
  6. Patient Melissa will lead a Q and A

Sunday • May 17 • 6 PM PST
Click here on start your meeting or
https://axisconciergemeetings.webex.com/axisconciergemeetings/j.php?MTID=mb896b9ec88bc4e1163cf4194c55b248f

OR
Join by phone: (855) 797-9485

Meeting Number (Access Code): 802 841 537 Your phone/computer will be muted on entry.
Slides will be available on the day of the talk here
There will be plenty of time for questions using the chat button. Meeting Password: addison
For more information, email us at mail@goodhormonehealth.com

🦓 Day 20, Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2020

And today, we talk about pink jeeps and ziplines…

How in the world did we get here in a Cushing’s Challenge?  I’m sliding these in because earlier I linked (possibly!) my growth hormone use as a cause of my cancer – and I took the GH due to Cushing’s issues.  Clear?  LOL

I had found out that I had my kidney cancer on Friday, April 28, 2006 and my surgery on May 9, 2006.  I was supposed to go on a Cushie Cruise to Bermuda on May 14, 2006.  My surgeon said that there was no way I could go on that cruise and I could not postpone my surgery until after that cruise.

I got out of the hospital on the day that the other Cushies left for the cruise and realized that I wouldn’t have been much (ANY!) fun and I wouldn’t have had any.

An especially amusing thread from that cruise is The Adventures of Penelopee Cruise (on the Cushing’s Help message boards).  Someone had brought a UFC jug and  decorated her and had her pose around the ship.

The beginning text reads:

Penelopee had a lovely time on Explorer of the Seas which was a five day cruise to Bermuda. She needed something to cheer her up since her brother, Tom, went off the deep end, but that’s another story!

Penelopee wanted to take in all of the sights and sounds of this lovely vessel. Every day she needed to do at least one special thing. Being a Cushie, she didn’t have enough spoons to do too much every day.

On the first day, she went sunning on the Libido deck……she didn’t last too long, only about 10 minutes. Goodness, look at her color! Do you think maybe her ACTH is too high?

Although I missed this trip, I was feeling well enough to go to Sedona, Arizona in August, 2006.  I convinced everyone that I was well enough to go off-road in a pink jeep,  DH wanted to report me to my surgeon but I survived without to much pain and posed for the header image.

In 2009, I figured I have “extra years” since I survived the cancer and I wanted to do something kinda scary, yet fun. So, somehow, I decided on ziplining. Tom wouldn’t go with me but Michael would so I set this up almost as soon as we booked a Caribbean cruise to replace the Cushie Cruise to Bermuda.

Each person had a harness around their legs with attached pulleys and carabiners. Women had them on their chests as well. In addition, we had leather construction gloves and hard hats.

We climbed to the top of the first platform and were given brief instructions and off we went. Because of the heavy gloves, I couldn’t get any pictures. I had thought that they would take some of us on the hardest line to sell to us later but they didn’t. They also didn’t have cave pictures or T-Shirts. What a missed opportunity!

This was so cool, so much fun. I thought I might be afraid at first but I wasn’t. I just followed instructions and went.

Sometimes they told us to break. We did that with the right hand, which was always on the upper cable.

After the second line, I must have braked too soon because I stopped before I got to the platform. Michael was headed toward me. The guide on the end of the platform wanted me to do some hand over hand maneuver but I couldn’t figure out what he was saying so he came and got me by wrapping his legs around me and pulling me to the platform.

After that, no more problems with braking!

The next platform was very high – over 70 feet in the air – and the climb up was difficult. It was very hot and the rocks were very uneven. I don’t know that I would have gotten to the next platform if Michael hadn’t cheered me on all the way.

We zipped down the next six lines up to 250-feet between platforms and 85-feet high in the trees, at canopy level. It seemed like it was all over too soon.

But, I did it! No fear, just fun.

Enough of adventures – fun ones like these, and scary ones like transsphenoidal surgery and radical nephrectomy!

🦓 Day 3: Cushing’s Awareness Challenge 2020

 

Sleep.  Naps.  Fatigue, Exhaustion.  I still have them all.  I wrote on my bio in 1987 after my pituitary surgery “I am still and always tired and need a nap most days. I do not, however, still need to take whole days off just to sleep.”

That seems to be changing back, at least on the weekends.  A recent weekend, both days, I took 7-hour naps each day and I still woke up tired. That’s awfully close to taking a whole day off to sleep again.

In 2006, I flew to Chicago, IL for a Cushing’s weekend in Rockford.  Someone else drove us to Lake Geneva, Wisconsin for the day.  Too much travel, too Cushie, whatever, I was too tired to stay awake.  I actually had put my head down on the dining room table and fallen asleep but our hostess suggested the sofa instead.  Amazing that I traveled that whole distance – and missed the main event 🙁

 

This sleeping thing really impacts my life.  Between piano lessons, I take a nap.  I sleep as late as possible in the mornings and afternoons are pretty much taken up by naps.  I nod off at night during TV. One time I came home between church services and missed the third service because I fell asleep.

I only TiVo old tv shows that I can watch and fall asleep to since I already know the ending.

A few years ago I was doing physical therapy twice a week for 2 hours at a time for a knee injury (read more about that in Bees Knees).  I come home from that exhausted – and in more pain than I went.  I know it’s working and my knee is getting better, but it’s such a time and energy sapper.  Neither of which I can really spare.

Maybe now that I’m nearly 14  years out from my kidney cancer (May 9, 2006) I’ve been back on Growth Hormone again.  My surgeon says he “thought” it’s ok.  I was sort of afraid to ask my endo about it, though but he gave me the go-ahead.  I want to feel better and get the benefits of the GH again but I don’t want any type of cancer again and I certainly can’t afford to lose another kidney.

I’ll probably just muddle through without it.  I always laugh when I see that commercial online for something called Serovital.  I saw it in Costco the other day and it mentions pituitary right on the package.  I wish I could take the people buying this, sit them down and tell them not to mess with their pituitary glands.  But I won’t.  I’ll take a nap instead because I’m feeling so old and weary today, and yesterday.

And tomorrow…